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Department of Music

Barbara Resch, D.M.E.
Department Chair and Professor

Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
2101 E. Coliseum Boulevard
Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1499

Phone: 260-481-6714
Fax: 260-481-5422
Email: music@ipfw.edu

Office: Rhinehart Music Center
Room: 144
Hours: Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm

IPFW Box Office

Fine Arts | Music | Theatre | VCD

Sounding Better Than Ever

The IPFW Department of Music now has the instruments it needs to sound better than ever. They have received funding from the Office of the Chancellor for new instruments; among them an alto flute, a four-octave xylophone, and a new set of timpani, all instrument models that are appropriate for college-level musicians and necessary to perform the complex music literature that trains college musicians to work professionally.

College of Visual and Performing Arts Dean John O’Connell sought $110,000 in funding from available funds from the chancellor on behalf of the Department of Music in August 2013. “Many of the instruments in use had been purchased in 1964, when the university opened and some were literally being held together with duct tape,” said O’Connell, “Although most students have their own personal instruments, the department owns some that are shared by many students such as large percussion. Also, some instruments are not practical for individual purchase, for instance the contrabass clarinet or the bass saxophone.”

Dr. Barbara Resch, Department of Music chair, and Dr. Dan Tembras, director of instrumental studies, prepared the request for new musical instruments. After assessing the department’s needs, Resch and Tembras compiled a list of instruments that the department lacked or needed to replace. Tembras solicited bids from respected vendors including payment options over several years and the cost for a one-time purchase. The request was approved for the entire amount.

The instruments will be used by our curricular instrumental ensembles, including several chamber music ensembles. Two marimbas made their debut in a recent concert by the Percussion Ensemble, and percussion instructor Eric Schweikert pointed out that some of the works performed would have been impossible before the acquisition of the new instruments.  “The instruments are just beginning to arrive,” said O’Connell, who recently inspected several of the new instruments. “They are very impressive and I was very excited to see them.”

Instruments in the purchase include a Di Zhao alto flute, a Buffet bass clarinet, a Selmer Paris contrabass clarinet, an International Winds bass saxophone, a set of four Adams Philharmonic timpani, two Adams five-octave marimbas, a Yamaha vibraphone, chimes and a glockenspiel by Adams, a Pearl Philharmonic field drum and bass drum stand, and several sets of Zildjian cymbals.

Music Receives Clavinovas

IPFW Department of Music Chair Barbara Resch received a $29,000 grant on behalf of her department to refurbish the piano laboratory on the second floor of the Rhinehart Music Center as part of the IPFW Transformational Allocation Proposals (TAP).

“I’m really excited about getting this grant,” said Resch. “The keyboards our students were working with had been in use for more than 20 years and they were beginning to have problems. We were able to work with our friends at Sweetwater Sound, a wonderful partner in the arts to IPFW, to purchase ten new Yamaha Clavinovas.”

IPFW received $326,000 in non-recurring state funding for the creation of projects and initiatives that could improve recruitment, retention, and revenue growth in fall 2013. IPFW sent out an invitation to faculty to determine designation of these funds, asking for grant proposals. The proposals were to be built around ideas that had the potential to increase recruitment and retention, or promote growth in some way.

All incoming freshmen and sophomore music majors are required to take piano and be piano proficient. Students need a quality instrument on which to learn or they could become discouraged. “Having these new clavinovas will help us with student retention and with recruitment,” explained Resch. “The TAP grant allowed us not only to replace the eight existing keyboards, but also to add two more clavinovas to the lab.”       

Students begin their instruction in group classes held in the piano lab, using electronic keyboards. The students each plug in a set of headphones to listen as they play and the professor also uses headphones and a microphone to listen to their work and give instruction. “Professors now have the opportunity to teach piano and know that their students will be focused on the lessons, rather than on faulty equipment that causes frustration in the learning process,” explained Resch.

 

Proud VPA Winners at Artie Awards

Artists affiliated with the IPFW College of Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) were some of the individuals recognized for their contributions to art and culture during the Artie Awards presentation at the recent Bravo Celebration held at the Arts United Center on Nov. 6, 2013.  Arts United annually celebrates the outstanding people and organizations who make significant contributions in northeast Indiana through arts and culture with the Artie Award.  In 2013, Arts United received thirty-three nominations for awards in five categories. During the Bravo Celebration, all nominees were recognized and winners were announced. This year, the beautiful awards were made for the event by printmaker and Department of Fine Arts alumna Julie Wall Toles, (’09) owner of Hedgehog Press. 

Dean John O’Connell received the Margaret Ann Keegan Arts Educator of the Year Award, which recognizes an individual who has made a significant contribution to furthering arts education in northeast Indiana. Recently appointed VPA dean, O’Connell is well known for his contributions to the field of arts education as a professor, mentor and chair of the IPFW Department of Theatre. Dean O’Connell’s work has connected IPFW students and faculty to the
community through partnerships with nonprofit arts organizations and area school systems.

Fine Arts alumna Catherine Nagy Mowry (’79, painting) received the Outstanding Artist of the Year award, which recognizes living artists active in any major discipline who have made significant artistic contributions. Nominated by Miami Indian Alliance for Miami Indians, Ms. Nagy Mowry is an accomplished visual artist who has dedicated her life to supporting cultural and fine arts including work with the Miami Indian Alliance, Artlink, Forks of the Wabash, Whitley County Historical Museum, the History Center, the Mihsihkinaahkwa Pow Wow, FAME, and ARCH among many.

Department of Music performance major Hope Arthur received the Outstanding Arts Collaboration Award for her work with the Fort Wayne Ballet. “Fort Wayne Ballet, Too” presented a balance of classical ballet masterworks and contemporary premiers that challenged the audiences’ traditional understanding of dance. In 2013, “Fort Wayne Ballet, Too” featured the musicians of the Hope Arthur Orchestra and was performed at the History Center’s Barr Street Market. More than 600 people came to this innovative, free outdoor performance.

World-Renowned Flute Duet  - Photo

A beautiful confluence of North and South Indian bamboo flute music by internationally revered artists Shashank Subramanyam and Rakesh Chaurasia starts the second season of the IPFW and Shruti of Fort Wayne Indian Performance Series on Saturday, Sept. 14 at 7: 30 p.m. IPFW and Shruti strive to bring to Fort Wayne world-renowned performers who represent the diverse Indian artists, dancers and musicians who tour the United States and abroad.

This highly successful collaboration has resulted in a hugely popular endeavor, with world-renowned sarod artist Ustad Amjad Ali Khan joining us in the Auer Performance Hall on March 22, 2014. He will perform with his sons Amaan Ali Khan and Ayaan Ali Khan and we are fortunate to be able to bring them to Fort Wayne as part of a very busy and full U.S. tour.

Tickets for the Sept. 14 concert are $10 and are still available at the IPFW Box Office. 260-481-6555 or www.ipfw.edu/tickets

Summer Vacation Exemplified – Audrey Painting Photo

IPFW Fine Arts Professor Audrey Ushenko demonstrated her painting techniques in the James R. Thompson Center (JRTC) Atrium in Chicago during a week-long interactive project sponsored by the Illinois State Museum from July 22 - 26, where she engaged the public in the creative process and fostered public discussion. Ushenko sketched and painted for the public, documenting the people who go through the building each day. Ushenko did a similar painting for IPFW that hangs in the Rhinehart Lobby.

Associate Professor of Music Melanie Bookout attended the 51st Viola da Gamba Society Conclave in July at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. Approximately 180 viola da gamba players from around the world attended the week-long workshop and concert series where they gathered to play music, attend classes and hear featured performers. The viola de gamba is a six-or seven-string bowed instrument that was popular during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Bookout also serves on the board of directors and two subcommittees for the conclave.

Jeff Casazza, associate professor of theatre, was a member of the international cast of The Proserpina Variations: The Wrath of Mother Nature, performed at the Festival di Teatro Eco Logico in Stromboli, Italy from June 22-26. Casazza performed the roles of Jupiter and Typhon in this devised theatre piece under the direction of Alessandro Fabrizi and Susan Main. Performed without electricity, the production was staged in a Greek-style amphitheater under a setting sun with the sea as a background, using various torches and candles for lighting as night fell.


During the National Theatre Conference of the Association of Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) in Orlando, Florida, Casazza served as the session chair and coordinator for two sessions between August 1-4; Devising Theatre in the Class: Creative Play that Leads to Engaging Theatrical Performances and Training Actors through Games: When Students Pay to Play. Casazza also presented two workshops; Devising a Structure to Teach Devising: Creating Theatre through Sound and Movement in Space and Time and Attack, Defend, Escape - Using Play to Embody Objectives and Tactics.

Assistant Professor Sam Savage, coordinator of voice for the Department of Music served on the faculty of the University of Toledo Art Song Festival in Ohio from June 26 – 30, 2013. IPFW vocal performance sopranos Natasha Kersjes and Stephanie Johnson auditioned for and participated in the festival, as well.

IPFW Department of Music continuing lecturer Ken Johnson, D.M.A., worked over the summer to prepare a course on interdisciplinary arts for online delivery with Aesthetic Press, Inc., associated with Colorado Christian University in Denver, Colorado. Johnson also completed a four-movement work for sopranino saxophone and guitar to be premiered by IPFW Department of Music Associate Professor Farrell Vernon, and continuing lecturer Laura Lydy. He also completed a first draft of new work for symphonic band.

Piano Competition to Air on PBS - Photo

 “The IPFW Gene Marcus Piano Competition and Camp are successful events on so many levels,” said Melinda Haines, director of the IPFW Community Arts Academy. “They aim to encourage young pianists to strive for excellence, and provide venues for them to both develop and show their artistry and be recognized.

The 2013 IPFW Gene Marcus Piano Competition Winners Recital, in which the top three contestants in each of the four age divisions performed, will be aired on WFWA/PBS39 on Oct.13 at 7:00 p.m. “The events involve IPFW piano faculty and students (both current and former), as well as guest artists and teachers,” explained Haines. “ All of whom work together to provide an ideal environment for learning and performance at the IPFW campus. In addition, residents of our area benefit from a number of performances by both gifted young musicians and internationally renowned concert artists who come to the Rhinehart Music Center at IPFW for the camp and competition.”

More than $3,000 in prizes were awarded at the competition, which attracted 33 competitors from a 100-mile radius of Fort Wayne, a requirement established by the major donor of the competition, Gene Marcus. The winners were chosen by a distinguished panel of internationally known pianists including Panayis Lyras, Michigan State University; Laura Melton, Bowling Green State University, and Caio Pagano, Arizona State University. IPFW faculty, students and alumni involved were:

Associate Professor Hamilton Tescarollo

            Competition and Camp Director

            Competition first round adjudicator and Camp Faculty

            Recital Performance

Assistant professor Joyanne Outland

            Competition first round adjudicator and Camp Faculty

Professor Robert Bean

            Competition first round adjudicator

Elsie Johnson (’10, piano performance)

            Solo Recital

Jason Simon, senior piano performance major

            Chamber music recital

            Camp practice coach

 

CAA piano students who were winners at the competition:

Julie Ana Cmelik, Elementary Division First Prize Winner (student of Carol Hahn)

Catherine Ji, Elementary Division Third Prize Winner (student of Christine Freeman)

Kevin Wang, Intermediate Division Third Prize Winner (student of Carol Hahn)

Caleb Stuckey, Senior Division Second Prize Winner (student of Hamilton Tescarollo)

Soham Govande, Elementary Division Honorable Mention (student of Mary Roth)

Janhavi Govande, Intermediate Division Honorable Mention (student of Mary Roth)

Valentina Murzin-Kudrna, Senior Division Honorable Mention (student of Christine Freeman)

CAA piano students who performed at Dr. Caio Pagano’s master class during the camp:

Brianna Bowman, Valentina Murzin-Kudrna, Caleb Stuckey

Colleagues Become New Leaders

The College of Visual and Performing Arts is pleased to welcome current colleagues in their new administrative roles.  Dr. Barbara Resch, professor of music, will serve as the new chair of the Department of Music and Craig A. Humphrey, associate professor of theatre will serve as the interim chair of the Department of Theatre for the 2013-14 academic year.

Dr. Resch began her tenure as chair of the Department of Music on July 1 and has served most recently as the director of music education.  Resch received the B. Mus. in organ performance from Valparaiso University, M.F.A. in musicology from Syracuse University and D.M.E. from Indiana University. Resch has been a full-time faculty member at IPFW since 1995 and served as associate dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts from 2007 - 2013. She has also helped to steer the direction of music education policy at both the state and the national levels through her position as president of the Indiana Music Education Association (IMEA).

As president of IMEA, Barbara Resch led a delegation to Washington D.C., meeting with Indiana’s representatives and senators to discuss the concerns of music educators and the role of accreditation in public education. Also, having been president of IMEA, Resch is familiar with all of the music programs offered across the state. “We have a music program at IPFW that is second to none in the state of Indiana. I’m so proud of the education our students receive at IPFW,” said Resch.

As chair, Resch wants to discover even more about her music colleagues to better understand their areas of research, interest and expertise so that the department can better promote their talented faculty. “IPFW has a great music faculty, a great talent pool. I want to be sure that we are using their expertise,” Resch explained. “I am finding out more about the University and how to affect change. I want to make things work for our department and to make the department more viable to the community of Fort Wayne.”

Craig A. Humphrey is the director of design technology and resident costume designer for the Department of Theatre and holds a M.F.A .in Costume Design from the University of Massachusetts and a B.F.A. in Acting from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Along with his teaching and administrative duties, he will direct the department’s production of Into the Woods in April.

Humphrey came to IPFW in 1991 from the University of Mississippi, where he served for three years as assistant professor of costume design. During his many years at IPFW he has taught a wide range of courses in a variety of areas. He regularly teaches courses in costume design, period styles for the theatre, American musical theatre, musical theatre performance, make-up, fundamentals of performance and textual analysis.  The university will conduct a nation-wide search for a new chair for the Department of Theatre to replace John O’Connell who was promoted to the dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

Welcome New Full-time Faculty

Jonathan Busarow: Associate Faculty

Director of University Singers and Chamber Ensemble

Degrees: M.M. in choral conducting, Ohio State University; B.M. vocal performance, Valparaiso University

Concurrently: Artistic Director of the Fort Wayne Children’s Choir and has served on the voice faculty in the Department of Music

Previously: Director of the Valparaiso Men’s Choir; Interim conductor of the Valparaiso University Chorale; Graduate teaching assistant at Ohio State University

Other Experience: Clinician and tenor soloist recently invited to conduct at the American Choral Directors Association National Conference.

 

Daniel Tembras: Assistant Professor and Director of Instrumental Studies

Degrees: D.M.A. in wind conducting, University of Texas at Austin; B.M., Michigan State University

Previously: Assistant to the Director of Bands, University of Texas at Austin;  

Director of the Longhorn Jazz Band and Combo and Assistant Director of the Longhorn Basketball and Volleyball Bands

Other Experience: In 2011, Dr. Tembras transcribed the world premiere of Aaron Copland’s The Tender Land Suite for Wind Ensemble and Voices performed by the University of Texas Wind Ensemble.

Associations: Member of the College Band Directors National Association; Michigan State Band and Orchestra Association; Texas Music Educators Association; International Trumpet Guild, and is a frequent clinician in the state of Michigan    

Honors and Accolades: Graduate Conducting Associate, University of Texas, Austin, 2010-11; Michigan State University Kenneth G. Bloomquist Fellowship in Wind Conducting, 2007-2009

 

Kryste Wallen

Visiting Instructor in Graphic Design

Degrees: M.B.A. in business management, Indiana Wesleyan University; B.F.A. Graphic Design and Photography, IPFW

Professional Experience: Owner and designer/creator at thin LINE INK; Managing Creative Director, Waterloo Design; Corporate Marketing Designer, Nationwide Studios, Inc.  Creative design, marketing, media consulting and social media maintenance for advertising and web design businesses and corporations

Professional Service: Board member for Boomerang Backpacks, a program to generate funds for backpack programs; Resource Committee member for Junior Achievement in Fort Wayne focused on class education initiatives

Gina Jisun Yi

Visiting Instructor in Music Education

Degree programs: Doctor of Philosophy in Music Education, Michigan State University, 2013; Master of Music Education, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea; 2006, Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance, Julliard School of Music, New York, New York

Professional experience: Music Teacher at Cornerstone Schools, Detroit, Michigan; Early Childhood Music Teacher, Michigan State University Community Schools in Detroit and Lansing, Michigan;  Adjunct Faculty in Music and Music Education, Baekseok Cultural University, Choong-Nam, South Korea; and Adjunct Faculty in Music Education, Yonsei University extension, Seoul, South Korea

Accomplishments: Yi has published a number of books and articles on the musical experiences of children, music in special education, music therapy, and song collections for children. Yi has also spoken and presented workshops on these topics at events and symposiums in the United States and internationally.

Confluence Story - Photo

Buenos Aires, Argentina and the College Music Society’s International Conference was the summer destination for two music faculty members where Confluence, the new composition for cello and piano written by Chris Rutkowski for the Audi-Tescarollo Duo received an international premiere. 

The work written by Rutkowski, clinical assistant professor of music composition and technology, was inspired by the confluence of the three rivers in downtown Fort Wayne, and performed by pianist Hamilton Tescarollo, associate professor of music and director of keyboard studies at IPFW, and cellist Carlos Audi in June in Buenos Aires. The piece was performed at the La Usina del Arte, a converted electricity-generating plant and one of the city’s most sought-after concert venues.

The Audi-Tescarollo Duo, which specializes in South American music, also was selected to present the program entitled Hidden Gems of Brazilian Music during this prestigious conference from more than 200 proposals submitted by international artists and scholars. The performance took place at the Borges Cultural Center, Auditorio Piazzolla, in downtown Buenos Aires.

Vernon Releases Two CDs - Photo

Associate Professor Farrell Vernon recently released two CDs through Centaur Records. Convergence: Sopranino Saxophone Across the Centuries (CRC3252) and Sempre Saxophone Quartet: Music of William Schmidt, (CRC3262) are both available on Amazon and iTunes. Convergence was recorded with a number of musical artists associated with the IPFW Department of Music including Melanie Bookout, viola da gamba; Brandon Ford, percussion; Laura Lydy, guitar, and Hamilton Tescarollo, piano.  Vernon is contracted to record two additional CDs with Centaur Records within the next two years.

Locke and Loaded Tour- Photo

Melanie Bookout, associate professor of music, has been rehearsing for six concerts all set for performance in fall 2013. Three of these concerts will be part of the Locke and Loaded tour, a collaboration between IPFW baroque gambists Melanie and Russell Bookout, Fort Wayne baroque soloists and New Comma Baroque. Locke and Loaded will feature English music spanning a period of great musical and political upheaval featuring works by Hely, Locke, Jenkins, Purcell, Simpson and Young.  Performances are scheduled for Indiana Wesleyan, Valparaiso University and IPFW on Saturday, September 14, at the Rhinehart Recital Hall at 2:30 p.m. Contact the IPFW Box Office at 260-481-6551 or www.ipfw.edu/tickets.

Robert Bean Steps Down as Chair

The Indiana Music Education Association (IMEA) Convention in Indianapolis in January 2006 was a watershed moment in the history of the Department of Music and in the career of Department of Music Chair Robert Bean. After manning the helm for the department since his arrival in September 2002, he saw his aspirations for the department coming true at the convention.

“We dominated the state-wide convention that year,” explained Bean. “Our chapter of the Collegiate Music Educators National Conference (now known as the National Association for Music Education) was recognized as the chapter of the year for the state of Indiana, we had three ensembles accepted to perform at the convention, several of our faculty presented workshops and papers and I was selected as the outstanding collegiate administrator of the year, an award that had been given only two other times in the past 20 years. That’s when I knew we had turned a corner.”

Fall 2013 will mark the 37th anniversary of when Dr. Robert Bean taught his first college class and with that in mind, Bean has decided to step down as chair of the Department of Music and return to the classroom. His last day as chair of the Department of Music is June 30 when Dr. Barbara Resch, director of music education, will assume those duties. “I want to go back to where I started, in the classroom, and become active as a pianist again,” said Bean, “And the job of chair makes that very, very difficult.”

“Dr. Bean has done a superb job of leading the Department of Music to great accomplishments in the last 11 years,” said John O’Connell, dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts (VPA). “We are very fortunate that he will continue to teach and influence our music students as professor of music and look forward to enjoying more of his creative endeavors.”

What attracted Bean to IPFW in 2002? One of the things Bean found most unusual and very appealing about the job description and the IPFW strategic plan in particular was that it was full of ambition and growth. In spite of the economy in 2002, when so many schools were cutting back and downsizing, IPFW was thinking of growth, development and moving forward. The vacancy also indicated the chair would oversee the building of a new music facility and the Rhinehart Music Center eventually opened in October 2007.

When Bean first arrived, he encountered talented and dedicated music faculty who, in Bean’s opinion, seemed not certain of their considerable abilities and the high quality of our department in comparison to our sister institutions around the country. It didn’t help being in the subterranean world of the Liberal Arts Building and having their performance spaces scattered throughout campus. According to Bean, “My first goal was to help them become aware of our collective potential, share with them a vision of growth and convince them that our future was even brighter than our present or our past. They bought into that vision, and look at what we, together, have accomplished in 11 years!”

Secondly, Bean felt that the department needed to increase the number of music majors, which had fallen somewhat in recent years to an approximate enrollment of 93. As of fall 2013 that number has almost doubled to 180 music majors. Bean feels continued growth in enrollment can be attributed to the department’s increased visibility through regional, national and international performances, a rapidly growing reputation for academic and artistic excellence, and the department’s 2007 move to the Rhinehart Music Center. “The building has certainly helped to enhance our reputation,” explained Bean, “but a building does not a music department make. Students are going to go where they get the best quality music instruction and significant scholarship funding, which we are now able to provide.”

Areas of study that continue to grow in the department are the IPFW/Sweetwater Music Technology Program and music therapy, especially since former Arizona Representative Gabby Gifford was shot and wounded. She attributed much of her recovery to music therapy and the attention it received in the media has translated into increased enrollment. “A very high percentage of the students auditioning for the fall semester are interested in music therapy,” explained Bean.

In 2002, the department had only $17,000 in scholarship funding each year to offer students. In the past two years it has been in the neighborhood of $160,000 annually. “All of that is due to the generosity of people like Ruth Rhinehart, Ione Auer and Gene Marcus, who are no longer with us,” said Bean. “But equally important are our current donors like Jack Kirby, Marcia Heller, Eleanor Engle, Jim and Irene Ator and Don and Doris Willis, who are frequent visitors to the department and have created permanent scholarship endowments. And certainly, we appreciate the generosity of so many others who contribute to scholarship funding and other funding that supports the work of the department.”

“Dr. Bean is a shining example of how to communicate with donors, those stakeholders who have given us named classrooms, performance spaces and equipment,” explained O’Connell. “He understands the importance of showing them appreciation and gratitude, all while engaging them in the process, so they can see the tangible results of their donation: the performances, the equipment, the students. He has been an excellent steward on behalf of the department.”

What does Dr. Bean see for the future of the department? Enrollment, in his opinion, may have to be capped in the future considering the limitations of space and resources. “It may be that our future focus will be on continually enhancing quality and outreach,” said Bean. “I also feel that my successor, Dr. Resch, is impeccably qualified to take on the duties of chair and provide visionary leadership as we continue to move forward. Her vast experience as associate dean of VPA, President of the Indiana Music Education Association and long-time director of music education will serve us well.”

Dr. Bean, professionally, will be more focused on his writing for music publications and performing. His recent collaboration with Julie Donnell, adjunct faculty in music, was very exciting, as he had not had a musical partner for several years. “So many of our students had not heard me perform, and they were so very supportive, even excited! I really like collaborative work, particularly accompanying singers,” said Bean. “I like that a lot.”

Climbing the Academic Ladder

Dr. Barbara Resch was promoted to full professor in music education in spring 2013. Assuming the duties of chair of the Department of Music on July 1, Resch has served as director of music education and associate dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts. She received the B. Mus. in organ performance from Valparaiso University, M.F.A. in musicology from Syracuse University and D.M.E. from Indiana University. Dr. Resch’s research interests include teenagers’ contextual decisions about music, implications for music education of brain-based learning, and curriculum development in music education. She is currently past president of the Indiana Music Education Association, and in this role participates in music education policy and organizational discussions on the state, regional and national levels. Visit her faculty page.      

Jeffrey Casazza was promoted to associate professor of theatre with tenure in spring 2013. Currently head of acting, movement and voice for the Department of Theatre, he received his M.F.A. in directing from Florida State University where he worked with Fred Chappell and Jose Quintero. He received his B.S. in theatre from Ball State University. His focus in the teaching of acting is to integrate the performer's skills in acting, voice and movement. His research interests include Stanislavski, Meisner and Chekhov; the Linklater Technique; and Suzuki, Viewpoints, Boal and Margolis Method. Visit his faculty page.

Hamilton Tescarollo, director of keyboard studies, was promoted to associate professor of music with tenure in spring 2013. He holds piano performance degrees from Arizona State University (D.M.A. and M.M.) and Faculdade Santa Marcelina (B.M.), and a piano diploma from Escola Municipal de Música de São Paulo. Tescarollo, an award-winning musician, maintains an extensive professional performance career. Recent performances have taken him to Austria, Brazil, Germany, Hungary, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and the United States. A dedicated teacher, his award-winning students have won competitions throughout the United States.Visit his faculty page.

Film Premiere at Cinema Center

After more than two years of work, Cerulean is set to premiere at the Fort Wayne Cinema Center on Friday, August 9 at 8:15 p.m. Visual Communication and Design Visiting Instructor Allen Etter and his students have lived with Cerulean as their constant companion throughout the lengthy directing, filming and editing process and they are excited for the region to see the results of their hard work and diligence.

Cerulean, a student driven independent film about a group of people stranded on an increasingly hostile world, is set far off in the future. When a power struggle erupts between the five, violence and death soon follow. Unbeknownst to them, a sixth individual is on the planet, keeping close watch on their actions.

The students filmed on location on the IPFW campus, Franke Park in Fort Wayne, Bluffton, Indiana and Ireland. They also were responsible for acting, camera work, computer graphic effects, stunt coordination, color balancing, soundtrack and second unit directing. IPFW students and alumni who performed in the project were Maggie Dye, Josh Adams, Luke Hathaway, James Baker, Debbie Ngo and Allegra White. A complete list of the crew is in their web site. They will be entering the film in a number of national film festivals including the Buffalo Niagara Film Festival, which features films, screenplays and music videos.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHgln9AbTlA&feature=em-upload_owner

http://ceruleanmovie.blogspot.com

http://ceruleanmovie.com/castcrew.html

http://www.cinemacenter.org/movies/movies/coming-attractions.php

Dan Butler to Direct and Star

One of the most exciting aspects of the IPFW Department of Theatre’s 2013-14 subscription season is a production of Our Town in December, directed by and starring Fort Wayne native Dan Butler. Butler will direct a contemporary approach to Thornton Wilder’s American classic where audience members will be closely involved in an emotionally unforgettable look at the everyday lives of the people who make up Grover’s Corners.

“Dan has requested to produce this play in our Studio Theatre, or as he refers to the space, ‘the old PIT theatre’,” explained Department of Theatre Chair John O’Connell. “Not only will he be directing and starring in the production, he also will be inviting many alumni from the ‘PIT’ days to join him. Our expectations are high for audience appeal on this show.”

An actor, writer, director and producer, Butler is probably best known as Bulldog from the TV series Frasier. His one-man show, The Only Thing Worse You Could Have Told Me…, garnered critical acclaim across the country, including Outer Critics Circle and Drama Desk nominations. Acting credits include major roles on and off-Broadway and at repertory companies across the U.S., as well as numerous television shows including House, Law and Order, From the Earth to the Moon and Prayers for Bobby. Film credits include Crazy, Stupid Love, Silence of the Lambs, Enemy of the State, Fixing Frank and Chronic Town.

Other shows in the season include two Fort Wayne premieres in Five Women Wearing the Same Dress and Gint, as well as Into the Woods, by the master of musical theatre, Stephen Sondheim. A season subscription consists of four (4) flexible tickets for $57 that may be used in any combination for the shows in the season. Subscribers will have the privilege of reserving their tickets to Our Town before tickets are made available to the general public on August 26, 2013.

Creative Endeavors This Summer

Fine Arts major Josh Pyburn recently returned from studying at the Indiana Limestone Symposium from June 9 -15, 2013 in Bloomington, Ind., located in Monroe County, which is part of the Indiana Stone Belt. The session consisted of seven days of immersive instruction in hand-carving limestone, including design, moving stone, splitting blocks, roughing out, using hand and pneumatic tools and lettering. Different guest instructors were featured each session.

Assistant Professor of Theatre Mark DeLancey is set designer and technical director for the Millbrook Playhouse in Mill Hall, Penn., designing sets for eight performances in two separate spaces. Millbrook Playhouse is a unique barn theatre with a thrust stage, having operated as a professional summer stock theatre since 1963. Featured on the Ryan Main Stage this summer are Grease, The Sound of Music, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Always Patsy Cline.

Fine arts major Jan Krist-Finkbeiner recently was awarded a $1,000 scholarship by Executive Women International as part of their ASIST program. Krist is currently traveling in Italy with the IPFW Department of Fine Arts and conducting research for a project involving the study of Italian tiles and mosaics.

Principal horn player with the Fort Wayne Philharmonic and IPFW Continuing Lecturer Michael Lewellen will be performing with the Grand Teton Music Festival this summer under the direction of Music Director Donald Runnicles. The Grand Teton Music Festival takes place each summer in Jackson Hole, Wyo., and features an orchestra comprised of musicians from all over the world.

Gabbard’s Photography Featured - Artwork

VCD continuing lecturer and international photographer Jim Gabbard has had two photographs from the Dominican Republic accepted in the juried gallery exhibit for the 1650 Gallery in Los Angeles title “I’ll Be Your Mirror” Portrait Photography Exhibition. The exhibition focuses on great portraiture and the challenge of capturing the personality behind the person. Expertise in this area of photographic art requires both technical know-how and an artist’s eye, combining technique, intuition and empathy. When done right, the unseen power of persona comes into focus and, as if by magic -- personality seems to jump from the page. View his contribution to this upscale online gallery.

Patel Joins Education Week - Artwork

VCD alumnus and current associate faculty Swikar Patel (’12, photography) has accepted a job offer from Education Week in Bethesda, Maryland. Education Week is a weekly national publication focusing on K-12 educational issues. He has been hired as a photo editor and will be managing the national pool of freelance photographers and scheduling assignments. Patel will work on content editing for the publication and also shoot and edit still photography and video for both the printed publication and web.

http://www.edweek.org/ew/index.html?intc=thed

Summer Exhibitions - Artwork

Works by junior fine arts major Brenda Drayer and Department of Fine Arts adjunct faculty Derek Decker have been accepted in exhibitions this summer. Derek was included in the exhibition Hard Ware: National Ceramic Exhibit this summer. Decker’s ceramic piece titled “99%” was shown in the Duncan-McAsher Gallery from May 24-June 22 and sponsored by the Hill County Arts Foundation in Ingram, Texas. Juan Granados, professor of ceramics at Texas Tech, juried the show and selected a total of 37 artists from a field of more than 700 entries.

Drayer was selected to exhibit her work in “Clothing Is Optional” a juried group exhibition sponsored by the National Association of Women Artists (NAWA) in New York City from July 11 – August 28, 2013. “Clothing Is Optional” gives female artists a chance to exhibit work exploring a variety of meanings either stated or implied; figurative, non-figurative, clothed, nude, covered, exposed, natural or free, perhaps even what lies beneath the skin.

Piano Competition Winners - Artwork

The final round of the IPFW Gene Marcus Piano Competition was held in the Rhinehart Recital Hall on Sunday, June 9, where more than $3,000 in prize money was awarded to 12 students in four age divisions. This marked the second year for the competition, which experienced a 10 percent increase in registered competitors from 2012. First-round auditions held May 18-19 in Rhinehart Recital Hall narrowed the 33 contestants to 20 finalists who competed for a three-member panel of judges from outside of Indiana. One of the judges remarked that the level of playing was extremely high and was very impressed by the students involved.

The IPFW Gene Marcus Piano Competition, limited to students from within a 100-mile radius of the campus, accommodates the wishes of Wilda “Gene” Marcus who funded endowments at IPFW for the purpose of establishing both a competition and camp for students in this area. Gene's son, Greg Marcus, spoke at the awards ceremony to encourage the young pianists to stick with their music throughout their lifetime. See our list of winners.

 

Welcome Dean John O’Connell

Following a nationwide search, Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) and

Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Steven T. Sarratore announced the appointment of John O’Connell as the new dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts (VPA), effective July 1, 2013. “The quality of the candidates who visited campus was high and I commend the search committee for their outstanding work. Please join me in welcoming John in his new (non-interim) role,” said Sarratore.

O’Connell has served as interim dean of VPA since July of last year. “I am grateful to the search committee and my colleagues for their vote of confidence in this appointment! I am excited about the tremendous possibilities that lie ahead for me working alongside our talented and dedicated colleagues in the College of Visual and Performing Arts,” said O’Connell on his selection.

O’Connell began his tenure at IPFW in 2007 as chair and professor of the Department of Theatre. From 1998 to 2007, O’Connell was at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, Ark., as an assistant and then associate professor of theatre. From 1995 to 1998 he was a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Prior to that, O’Connell worked in various off- and off-off-Broadway theatres as a producer, director and stage manager.

Top-Ranking Visual and Performing Arts Graduates

Highest Distinction - Heather M. Moser, B.A. in Theatre, 3.99 G.P.A.

Distinction - Tylar M. Allison, B.F.A. in Visual Communication and Design, 3.96 G.P.A.

Distinction - Kearstyn M. Keller, B.A. in Theatre, 3.95 G.P.A.

Distinction - Amy E. Schwarz, B.M.E. in Music Education, 3.94 G.P.A.

Distinction - Nicole M. Metzger, B.A. in Art Education, 3.93 G.P.A.

Spring 2013 Dean’s List

The College of Visual and Performing Arts is pleased to report that 23.7% of our students or 150 out of 633, made the Dean’s List for spring 2013. The Dean’s List is reserved for students who have achieved a 3.5 minimum cumulative G.P.A. and a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. for the semester. CVPA extends a hearty congratulation to these students for their hard work and dedication to their studies.

VPA Pitches a Home Run

In April, students from IPFW Visual Communication and Design (VCD) won $1,000 for their department by designing and presenting their campaign for a new logo and promotional materials for the Three Rivers Festival (TRF) at the downtown Allen County Library. Faculty advisor and continuing lecturer John Motz helped the VCD students prepare for the design competition that included teams from the University of Saint Francis, Indiana Tech and Ivy Tech. “Through strong research, excellent design and a professional-quality presentation by the students we won the competition and secured the $1,000 prize,” explained Motz.

The PITCH, an event devised and sponsored by the American Advertising Federation of Fort Wayne (Fort Wayne AdFed), was a competition for area university graphic design students to create a marketing plan, new artwork and communication tools for the Fort Wayne Three Rivers Festival 2013. Students had to pitch their concepts to local ad agency executives and Jack Hammer, executive director of TRF, in an attempt to win the prize money.

The PITCH was designed to provide an opportunity for university students to work with actual clients in the community, helping them enhance essential skills to take with them into their future careers. Fort Wayne AdFed members who organized this event included Megan Tiffany (’10), a VCD alumna and email designer with Vera Bradley, and Michael Limmer, vice president of marketing, Fort Wayne TinCaps. The event was such a great success they already are making plans for next year. ”I was blown away by the local talent from our students and their sheer enthusiasm in their presentations,” explained Tiffany. “All schools talked about ‘next year’ and how great the experience was.”

Fort Wayne AdFed directors already have begun planning for next year's PITCH competition and plan to prepare the students for another great experience. To learn more about Fort Wayne AdFed visit http://www.adfedfortwayne.org/

Excellence in Research Award

The College of Visual and Performing Arts Faculty Affairs committee has awarded Assistant

Professor of Art Education Laurel Campbell the VPA Excellence in Research/Creative Endeavor Award for 2013. Campbell’s recent project, an anthology titled, “The Heart of Art Education:

Holistic Approaches to Creativity, Transformation, and Integration,” published in September

2012 by the National Art Education Association was the focus of her application.

The committee took note of not only her recent book publishing, but also her collaboration with other scholars who contributed to the book and her “myriad articles and presentations in publications and conference.” The committee noted that this was all evidence of diligence in Campbell’s research and growing national reputation. Campbell received a $1,000 award and will be added to plaque honoring past recipients currently on display in the dean’s office.

Campbell co-edited the book with Dr. Seymour Simmons III from Winthrop University; they reviewed more than 70 submissions in order to end up with 36 chapters, and spent years editing the material to perfection. The 34 authors are from the U.S., Canada, Sweden and South Korea. Campbell’s research chapter was the culmination of many years of work on various topics, including spirituality in teaching, curriculum theory, theory in practice and teacher education.

Sasha Allgayer – Graduate Student Employee of the Year

IPFW’s Career Services (CS) and Financial Aid Office (FAO) awarded Sasha Allgayer the Graduate Student Employee of the Year award in April. Allgayer works for the College of Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) as the producer of the weekly television series Arts Weekly and was recognized for his commitment to IPFW and the arts.

IPFW has more than 850 student employees and in an effort to recognize the invaluable work these students do, each year CS and FAO ask for nominations for this award that consists of a plaque and a cash award to be used for education. Nominated by Melinda Haines, assistant to the VPA dean for community engagement and host of Arts Weekly, Allgayer was congratulated for treating his graduate assistantship like a career with a high level of professionalism in what can be a high-stress environment.

“Sasha is wonderful to work with,” explained Haines. “All of our guests and team and crew members enjoy working with him. He is respectful, smart, industrious and hard working. When presented with a new challenge, he doesn't panic but works through it, alerting team members in advance if necessary. He always has a smile on his face and is willing to go the extra mile.”

Jeff Casazza – Leepoxy Plastics Teaching Award Winner

Jeff Casazza, associate professor of theatre, has won the Leepoxy Plastics, Inc. Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching for his innovative approach to the teaching of Theatrical Composition. The award was established in 2003 by area businessman Lawrence Lee to recognize and encourage innovative undergraduate teaching that enhances student learning.

The selection committee, comprised of two faculty members, two students and a staff member designated by the vice chancellor of academic affairs, chose Casazza from among five nominees from three colleges. In coming to a consensus on the winner, the insights and perspectives of the student members of the committee were particularly persuasive. Further, Casazza provided ample convincing evidence showing that his innovation enhanced learning outcomes. The chancellor will present Jeff with the award and $1,000 in professional development funds at the annual convocation ceremony in August 2013.

Jazz Combo Invited to Play in NYC

The jazz combo Postmodern Prohibition was invited to perform at the New York City Jazz Festival held April 18-21. Sponsored by Sweetwater Sound, which helped finance the trip, the group (also known as the Sweetwater Jazz Project) includes two IPFW music majors, sophomores Evan Gidley on sax and Travis Lyons on guitar, and two high school seniors, Leland Nelson on bass from Canterbury High School and Sean Christian Parr on drum set from Carroll High School.

Postmodern was one of only ten groups selected to play at the festival. Other festival performers included four big bands from high schools and a middle school from California, Florida, New Jersey and Canada, along with five vocal jazz ensembles from high schools and a small university. They performed in the Allen Room located in Jazz at Lincoln Center, located on the fifth floor of the Time Warner building, overlooking Columbus Circle and Central Park.

“The entire experience was very memorable,” reflected Gidley, “and it was a ton of fun to finally go after all of the hours spent playing gigs around town to make the money we needed to pay our portion of the trip.”

Other highlights of their trip included listening to live jazz at Birdland and the Jazz Standard jazz club, participating in a clinic by a local jazz pianist David Berkham and attending a Q&A session with John Fedchock, a trombonist from NYC, and Janis Siegal, one of the members of the renowned vocal jazz group, the Manhattan Transfer. The festival concluded with a concert featuring Fedchock’s big band and Siegal singing with members of the vocal jazz ensembles, followed by a midnight cruise on the New York Harbor for the festival’s participants.

A Visceral Interpretation of Space

In May, Visual Communication and Design (VCD) alum Gregor Roth (’11) received his M.F.A. in Studio Arts from Maine College of Art (MECA) in Portland, Maine. The 2013 M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition of the graduates’ work is on display at the Institute of Contemporary Art at MECA from May 14 through June 12. Roth has served as adjunct faculty in VCD while working on his advanced degree. MECA offers a low-residency M.F.A. in Studio Art, among the first of its kind in the nation.

Roth’s project abstract explains his view that typically art viewership is a static process where one stands in front of the image, gazing and studying, never merging in a real and natural manner with the artwork, rarely making more than a short-term emotional connection. In Roth’s site-specific thesis installation, string and yarn act as line and are used to draw in space to construct the illusion of structure. Roth asks the viewer to engage in a more intuitive and visceral interpretation of space by forming a third environment, encouraging the viewer to merge physically and emotionally in the work, altering his perceptions of space and time. Roth’s work has been well-received and contemporary performance groups are interested in exploring more about his visceral interpretation of space.

Sara Nordling Exhibition

The solo exhibition Plication, Weavings by Sara Nordling currently is being shown at The Arts Place in Portland, Ind., from May 17 – June 28, 2013. Her weavings celebrate the process of producing textiles that stand on their own; works that are simple yet very complex. Nordling, adjunct faculty in the Department of Fine Arts, teaches design and painting for non-majors. Visit The Arts Place online for more information.

Moser as Orlando and Orlando

Senior theatre major Heather Moser will wrap up her education at IPFW in the title role of Orlando, written by Virginia Woolf and adapted for the stage by Sarah Ruhl.  Orlando will open at Williams Theatre Friday, April 12, and run through April 19.  Orlando will take audiences on a journey through the centuries, bending their understanding of gender as Orlando, who begins as an Elizabethan nobleman, becomes a 19th-century woman. Moser will have plenty of room to stretch her skills as an actor in this contemporary adaptation directed by Jeff Casazza, IPFW associate professor of acting, movement and voice.

“I’m in the process of completing the Honors Certificate along with my B.A. in Theatre,” said Moser. “When Jeff put Orlando on the calendar I was really excited that we would be doing the play, and when he asked if I would like to do this as my honors project,” said Moser, “my response was an enthusiastic yes.”

The IPFW Honors Program is open to all students with a 3.3 cumulative grade point average (GPA) or better.  IPFW has created the Honors Program capstone course, in which participating students are asked to undertake an independent research project under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Each project encourages intellectual independence and introduces students to proper research methods in preparing for graduate work. In preparing for the role of Orlando, Moser thoroughly researched the life and writings of Virginia Woolf. “I was astounded at how much this project has changed my perceptions on research,” explained Moser. “My (artistic) choices have been greatly influenced and are much more informed.”

This will be Moser’s 14th play at IPFW. Her roles have included ensemble work in The Yellow Boat, Servant 3 in King Lear, Third God in The Good Person of Szechuan, and Old Sally in Oliver! In preparing for these roles Moser has trained in hand-to-hand combat, learned a British accent and taken movement and dance.  But this kind of in-depth research as part of the honors project is new for Moser, who plans to do more research of her roles in the future. “Hopefully it all results in a more fully fleshed individual,” said Moser. “I think it really adds to the dimension of the character.” 

In addition to her studies at IPFW Moser is also a horseback riding instructor for the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) After 16 years as a competitive Jumper/Hunter, Moser decided to put her passion and skills to work teaching autistic children and disabled children to ride.

“Five years ago I was enrolled at a different school and on my way to becoming a physical therapist,” Moser continued. “Not only has the theatre department become family, it’s helped me to open my imagination, form my own opinions and learn to express myself. It was one of the best decisions of my life.” For more information on the IPFW Honors Program visit: http://new.ipfw.edu/honors/

Petrovsky Hits the Big Time

The Little Quest of Petrovsky, an animated short by Andres Montenegro, has been accepted to compete in the International Animation Film Market’s Annecy International Film Festival in Annecy, France, June 10-15, 2013. The film will be competing in the animated short film category and Montenegro, IPFW assistant professor of modeling and animation, has been selected for a residency award.

Created in 1960, the competition categories include short films, long films, student films and films made for television, advertising and the internet. Festival partners include Adobe, Arte France and Walt Disney Studios. The festival’s creative focus is an incubator for projects and an ideal forum for animation professionals and the talents of tomorrow.

“Annecy is a uniquely important event in our annual calendar, because it combines the world's leading animation festival with a market dedicated to animation,” explains Disney, a festival partner, on Annecy’s web site. “Similarly, the creative focus provides an important intersection between art and commerce in which a diverse cross-section of international talent can take their first shot at pitching new ideas to the market.”

Montenegro has based his cinematic narrative on the paintings of French painter and stage designer Balthasar Klossowski de Rola (Balthus), who is noted for his carefully constructed figures. Montenegro’s central character, Petrovsky, is a lonely character concerned about his future and worried about how to navigate the emotional landscape of middle age. Alone and frustrated, Petrovsky recently has been dismissed from the WWII Asia-South Pacific war. As he frets over his future, Petrovsky finds a mysterious map containing clues inviting him to meet a mysterious lady in the middle of nowhere. Petrovsky, worried that this will be one more of his usual disappointments, discovers a hopeful turn of events.

Over the past 25 years the Annecy International Film Festival has established itself as a leading event in the industry.  Films shown at the festival are made available on the festival website and therefore benefit from such high visibility.

Haritun’s Love Affair with Music

Music has been the major love of Rosalie Haritun’s life; and even into her upcoming retirement, she has plans that continue to center around music.  Rosalie Haritun, associate professor of music, will be retiring at the end of spring semester 2013 after serving as a member of the Department of Music faculty since 1988. “When I first came to IPFW my classes were held in the Liberal Arts Building in the basement,” recalled Haritun, “That’s been a few years, 25 years to be exact.”

After receiving her Bachelor in Music Education from Baldwin-Wallace Conservatory in 1960, Haritun earned an M.S. from the University of Illinois in 1961 and earned an Ed.D. from Columbia University in 1968.  During her tenure at IPFW she has served as the Department of Music chair and as coordinator of music education, along with teaching music education and music appreciation courses.

Music for the Listener is a general education course that helps students listen to music with a critical ear. Classical music can be a bit intimidating to many, but Haritun has worked to make it accessible to literally thousands of students in her 25 years at IPFW.  “I love classical music. I always have. I guess I’ve always been a bit of a music snob,” said Haritun, “I kind of stopped listening to pop music with the Beatles.”

To help guide new music educators, Haritun wrote the Music Teachers Survival Guide: Practical Techniques & Materials for Elementary Music Classroom, Parker Publishing, in 1994. She also has been a field editor for Prentice Hall textbooks since 2002 and has plans to continue that work into the future.  “I had been teaching music education classes for a few years and saving all my lesson plans,” explained Haritun. “One day I realized I had this huge stack of them and I thought, well that’s enough to pull a book together. So I did.”

Haritun has loved music her entire life and has been in a classroom either as a student or teacher since she was five years old. “I can remember when I was little, I took a stick and I pounded a few nails in it and I would pretend that it was an instrument. I’d sit out on the front porch pretending to play that thing lifting my fingers up and down on those nails,” Haritun recalled.

She went on to learn to play several instruments including clarinet and trombone. She had considered becoming a professional musician, but fell in love with teaching along the way. “I really could swing that trombone though,” said Haritun with a laugh.

While Haritun grew up in New York and still owns a home there, she plans to stay in Fort Wayne. “It’s where my friends are, where my community is. I haven’t really planned the rest out,” said Haritun.  “I never really had the chance to travel; I’d like to do some of that.”

The Department of Music has planned a reception in honor of Dr. Haritun Monday, April 29, from 6 – 7:30 p.m. in the Auer lobby prior to the Community Orchestra Concert, which starts at 7:30 p.m.  Friends, colleagues, students and former students are invited to visit with Dr. Haritun to wish her well.

Pressler Impresses

IPFW alumna Blane Pressler recently was cast in the role of Jesus in Passion an adaptation of the Biblical story of the last days of Christ, written by Pam Reckamp. The play was presented by the Spotlight Theatre at the Skip Virah Center for the Arts, in St Louis, Missouri, on March 22, 2013.

In April, Pressler will take part in the 2013 St. Louis Shake38, a 38-play Shakespeare marathon that takes place throughout St. Louis and in surrounding communities, in advance of the St. Louis Shakespeare Festival. This year, Shake38 will celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday, running April 19, 2013, through the Bard’s birthday on April 23. Pressler will take part in an updated version of Romeo and Juliet at Nevous International in St Charles, Missouri, on April 23.  The cast of six each will take on multiple roles. Pressler’s roles will include the Friar, the Nurse and Gregory.

Pressler will continue to stay busy throughout the summer season at the Ozark Actors Theatre, in Rolla, Missouri.  He has been cast as Captain Hook in Peter Pan, Leon in Fools and the Baker in Into the Woods.

Music Receives Clavinovas

IPFW Department of Music Chair Barbara Resch received a $29,000 grant on behalf of her department to refurbish the piano laboratory on the second floor of the Rhinehart Music Center as part of the IPFW Transformational Allocation Proposals (TAP).

“I’m really excited about getting this grant,” said Resch. “The keyboards our students were working with had been in use for more than 20 years and they were beginning to have problems. We were able to work with our friends at Sweetwater Sound, a wonderful partner in the arts to IPFW, to purchase ten new Yamaha Clavinovas.”

IPFW received $326,000 in non-recurring state funding for the creation of projects and initiatives that could improve recruitment, retention, and revenue growth in fall 2013. IPFW sent out an invitation to faculty to determine designation of these funds, asking for grant proposals. The proposals were to be built around ideas that had the potential to increase recruitment and retention, or promote growth in some way.

All incoming freshmen and sophomore music majors are required to take piano and be piano proficient. Students need a quality instrument on which to learn or they could become discouraged. “Having these new clavinovas will help us with student retention and with recruitment,” explained Resch. “The TAP grant allowed us not only to replace the eight existing keyboards, but also to add two more clavinovas to the lab.”       

Students begin their instruction in group classes held in the piano lab, using electronic keyboards. The students each plug in a set of headphones to listen as they play and the professor also uses headphones and a microphone to listen to their work and give instruction. “Professors now have the opportunity to teach piano and know that their students will be focused on the lessons, rather than on faulty equipment that causes frustration in the learning process,” explained Resch.

Internship Creates Momentum

After completing two curatorial internships, IPFW Fine Arts senior Shelby Akers now is  working for the Fort Wayne Museum of Art (FWMoA). Akers’ history with the FWMoA began in the spring of 2012 when she applied for and received the first of two consecutive curatorial internships at the museum. “It was a great experience,” said Akers. “I did a little of everything from black tie events to packing and unpacking of art work. I learned about lighting, hanging art and did some matting.”

Originally from Plymouth Ind., Akers grew up in Las Vegas, Nev., but returned to the Fort Wayne area and IPFW specifically to attend classes in the Department of Fine Arts. Akers took a course with IPFW assistant professor of art education Laurel Campbell where Campbell required each student in the class to donate 30 hours of art related volunteer service in the greater Fort Wayne community. “That’s when I decided to try and do some work for the art museum,” said Akers.

The Curatorial Internship Program at the FWMoA provides a general overview of the curatorial department, which is responsible for the stewardship of the permanent collection as well as the design and installation of permanent and temporary exhibits. Amanda Martin, coordinator of the internship program at FWMoA, directed Akers to www.indianaintern.net, the Indiana intern site that posts internship applications and job postings from around the state. “I wasn’t sure I would get the position, but I filled out the online form and within a very short period of time I was called in for an interview,” explained Akers. “I went through the same process for my second internship.”

“Shelby had many great qualities that led to us offering her not only one, but two successive internships, as well as sustaining contract work here at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art,” said Sarah Aubrey, curator of American Art at the FWMoA. “Shelby was hard-working, reliable and quick to learn new skills.”

Aubrey went on to explain that students who are well versed in the arts can quickly integrate into the major research and art handling aspects of the FWMoA internship program. “Shelby had a diverse and outstanding work resumé,” Aubrey continued, “and we were impressed that she was seeking out these internships for personal and professional growth; not merely as a course requirement.”

The museum’s internship program is designed to give students practical, real-world experience in the museum field. Aubrey explained that in this context Shelby also was able to develop her personal network and skills essential to the fields of research, art handling and exhibition design. “Even though I did the same internship both times, I ended up doing very different things,” said Akers, who was thrilled to receive the position.

Akers would advise other students not only to seek an internship, but apply for scholarships that are being offered through their department. Akers has been the recipient of both the 2011-12 Matthew J. Stein Memorial Scholarship and the 2012-13 Ione Auer Scholarship. “I didn’t know if I would be eligible for an internship or the scholarships,” said Akers, “but I found out that you won’t know until you try. People just need to try. I did and I was eligible for both.”

VCD Receives Silver and Gold!

Eight students from the IPFW Department of Visual Communication and Design (VCD) were awarded Addys during the annual American Advertising Federation of Fort Wayne’s 2013 recognition gala titled, “You’re My Type.” This year’s event was held in the Auer Performance Hall in the Rhinehart Music Center at IPFW on Saturday, February 16, at 8:00 p.m. The American Advertising Federation of Fort Wayne is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and improving the advertising industry. Each year scores of outstanding designers, agencies and student designers are recognized with Addy Awards, acknowledging those whose skills and talents help cultivate a better understanding of the economic and social values of advertising for all people. 2013 VCD student winners include:

Uzoma Albert, Student Gold Addy, Category: Business-to Consumer Campaign

Kezia D’Souza (class of ’12), Student Silver Addy, Category: Elements of Advertising-Visual Illustration

James Farr III, Student Silver Addy, Category: Direct Marketing

Isaac Fingerle, Student Gold Addy, Category: Business-to Consumer Campaign

John Ilang-Ilang, Student Gold Addy, Category: Non-Traditional Advertising Campaign

Simone LeClear, Student Gold Addy, Category: Collateral Material/ Poster

Emma McCarron (Class of ’12), Student Gold Addy, Category: Business-to Consumer Campaign and Student Silver Addy, Category: Promotion-Packaging

Curtis Waters, Student Gold Addy, Category: Business-to Consumer Campaign

Collage Brings Community Together

Fine arts senior Angela Ellsworth has been guiding 199 students and staff at the Boys and Girls Club of Huntington as they make a positive impact on their community by sharing their positive thoughts with each other. A unique collage-building project, supported by the LaFontaine Arts Council’s Art in Education Outreach program, involved students painting layers of positive messages in watercolor that were torn into pieces and used to create the accordion shape design.

“If you look at one side it’s the logo of the Boys and Girls Club and if you look at it from the other side it’s a heart,” Ellsworth said. “I wanted the kids to come up with something really positive; something that made them really happy, something they loved to do, just to get them thinking in a positive frame of mind.”

She also liked the idea because the children could paint their phrase however they wanted, which gave new meaning to art for the many children who thought they were bad at art. “It just reinforced that you do not need to be an artist to be creative or to create something beautiful and that, a lot of times, when we work together with positive thoughts and energy beautiful things can be done,” Ellsworth said. “I just tried to reinforce that throughout this whole project.”

The project will be signed and displayed with a plaque naming the 199 students and staff who participated in the project. The project will be displayed at different venues throughout Huntington County. The traveling display will start at the Huntington City Township Public Library and will be available to other businesses, schools and Huntington Parkview Hospital throughout the year.

Forging New Frontiers

Fine Arts assistant professor and art historian Kirsten Ataoguz’s research project Light, Liturgy and Art in the Church of the Monastery of Saint John, Müstair (CH) was awarded $44,166 in the 2012-2013 Indiana University New Frontiers in the Arts & Humanities competition. Collaborating on the project is Professor Beomjin Kim, director of the Information Analytics and Visualization Center at IPFW in the Department of Engineering, Technology and Computer Science.

The goal of the cross-disciplinary research project for January 2013 – December 2013 is to recreate in a 3D model where sunlight fell on the walls of the church of the Monastery of Saint John on any given day in any given year to test the hypothesis that the layout of paintings was coordinated with the windows so that sunlight would spotlight specific images on specific days and at specific hours.

To test this theory, Ataoguz and Kim are together creating a 3D model that visualizes passage of sunlight on any particular day onto and across the walls of the church. Ataoguz also is creating an annotated liturgical calendar that plots correspondences between highlighted panels and liturgical commemorations in order to evaluate the specificity and intentionality of any lighting effects. The developed software system then will be used with minor modification to analyze other significant monuments.

“Being awarded a New Frontiers Grant is a significant vote of confidence in a professor’s work,” explained Faith Hawkins, chief of staff to the Vice President for Research at IU. “We are able to support a wonderfully wide range of work that falls in the category of arts and humanities.”

Indiana University has provided funding for research, scholarship and creative activity through the New Frontiers in the Arts & Humanities program since 2004-05. The New Frontiers grant, originally funded through a five-year Lilly Endowment, was of such groundbreaking significance that IU President Michael McRobbie chose to continue the funding for an additional five years. The objective of this program is to help Indiana University faculty members by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly investigation or creative activity.

Other current and previous professors at IPFW have been funded through the New Frontiers program.  They include:

Clark Butler (2006)

Richard Weiner (2007 and 2011)

Christopher Andres (2010)

Richard Elaver (2010)

Ann Livschiz (2010)

Sayaka Ganz, Dances of Nature

The work of Sayaka Ganz, who previously taught in the IPFW Department of Fine Arts, will be featured in her first Italian solo exhibition Sayaka Ganz, Dances of Nature from March 30-May 26, 2013. The exhibition is organized by the Hermann Geiger Cultural Foundation, Cecina, Livorno, Italy and curated by the art director of the foundation, Alessandro Schiavetti.

Known for her work with reclaimed plastics, Ganz proves that one woman’s trash is truly another woman’s treasure. Her work pulls household plastic into harmony with the natural world. The end result is both inspiring and uplifting. “The best way for artists to help reduce waste is to show how beautiful these materials can be and what can be done,” says Ganz. For information on this exhibition visit www.fondazionegeiger.org or www.sayakaganz.com

SmartARTS ~ Take Five

What do you think of when you hear the words “take five?” Do you think of a candy bar? Or maybe a well-deserved break? For millions of people these words are forever linked to a jaunty syncopated tune written by Paul Desmond, alto saxophonist for the David Brubeck Quartet. The group recorded the tune on what would become a landmark recording, Time Out, in 1959.

Take Five, written in 5/4 time was the antithesis of all pop music held sacred at the time: three minutes, three verses and 4/4 time. To this day it is one of Brubeck’s most popular recordings, selling more than five million copies. On March 18 the IPFW Faculty Jazz Combo will present

A Tribute to the Music of Dave Brubeck.

The music of David Brubeck, who died in December 2012 at the age of 91, was hugely popular in the 1950s and the 1960s. Those too young to remember the era might be current fans of the AMC period drama Mad Men, which harkens back to the ’60s or TV Land’s nostalgic hits like The Dick Van Dyke Show. The ’60s also are remembered for the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, John F. Kennedy and the Vietnam War. During these years Brubeck made history not only with his music, but also by standing up to a number of college deans who asked him not to perform with racially mixed bands when performing at their colleges.

As a child Brubeck was forbidden to listen to music on the radio. His mother believed that if you wanted to hear music, you should play it. As a result Brubeck and his brothers played a variety of instruments at early ages. Born cross-eyed, Brubeck learned to play by ear because sight reading was almost impossible for him. Despite his poor eyesight Brubeck graduated from the College of the Pacific at Stockton, Cal., with a bachelor of music in 1942. Upon graduation Brubeck joined the U.S. Army, and served in northeast France during WWII, where Brubeck’s prowess as a musician was noticed by a commanding officer. It was decided that Brubeck’s skills would best be used as a military musician backing USO performers.

The IPFW Jazz Faculty Combo will be performing arrangements of great Brubeck jazz classics including Take Five, The Unsquare Dance, Blue Rondo ala Turk and Three To Get Ready on March 18 at 7:30 p.m. in the Rhinehart Recital Hall. Admission is $7 and under with IPFW students and children 10 and under admitted free. For information call the IPFW Box Office at 260-481-6555 or purchase tickets online at www.ipfw.tickets.edu.

It’s a Fine Life

Oliver!, the beloved musical adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist runs from Feb. 8 – 17, 2013, at the Arts United Center and audiences are in for a delightful new “twist” when Julie Jahn uses some exciting sign-language techniques to interpret the final performance on Sunday, February 17.

Jahn, who is the sign language interpreter for the Department of Theatre, received specialized training over the summer specifically geared toward delivering more exciting and complete musical interpretation during a weeklong workshop in August, 2012, at Bringing the Stage to Life (BSL) in Nashville, Tenn.

During the BSL workshop, 23 sign-language interpreters from around the country learned enhanced techniques to more effectively interpret Broadway musicals and music concerts like those performed at the Grand Ol’ Opry. Jahn is excited to try some of these new techniques with the musical Oliver!

The concept behind the BSL training is that you become the character you are signing. That means changing your facial expressions and physical movement for each character as the story moves forward. It also can mean donning country western attire if you are interpreting singers on the Opry stage, for example. Properly interpreted, the deaf should be able know who you are and not just what you are saying with your hands.

Classes were offered in acting, costuming, character make-up and understanding the complexities of different performance stages and major concert venues. “The interpreter needs to interpret ‘who’ is on stage and not ‘what’ is on stage,” explained Jahn. “Simply by costuming the interpreter for example, you create a more seamless presentation between the song and what you are doing in the eyes of the deaf. They want to see the music.”

It will be Jahn’s task to give voice to a cast of characters that ranges from the innocent Oliver to the villainous Bill Sykes to the scheming Fagin. It also will be her task to bring Lionel Bart’s beloved melodies into sight. So how does one prepare to interpret for such a big production? “I read the play three to five times, I listen to the music dozens of times and then I go see a rehearsal so that I know how the show is blocked. I have to learn the lyrics completely and I need to be prepared for those times when a characters' back might be turned to me,” explained Jahn. “I also reflect the characters personalities as I deliver their lines. It can be very challenging.”

In the fall, Jahn interpreted The Women of Lockerbie for the IPFW Department of Theatre. “When the characters were yelling or crying it was my job to bring those inflections into my work,” said Jahn. “It can be exhausting, but it’s always really satisfying to me. I try my best to melt in with the cast and become part of what they are doing. Interpreting needs to be a parallel thing, not a tennis match.”

Jahn began interpreting 33 years ago and started interpreting theatrical productions for IPFW 12 years ago. Her work with IPFW has grown over the years and she has served as a personal interpreter for numerous deaf students at IPFW. In addition to her work as an interpreter, Jahn teaches workshops and helps others to learn sign language.

Performances for Oliver! are at the Arts United Center from Feb. 8 – 17, 2013. For more information on tickets call the ArtsTix Community Box Office at 260-42-24226 or visit https://tickets.artstix.org.

SmartARTS

On Feb. 13, 2013, when guest artist Kate Boyd sits down at 7:30 p.m. to perform at the seven-foot Steinway "prepared" piano in Rhinehart Recital Hall, she will perform some of the most avant-garde, manipulated music most of us ever have heard coming from this time-honored instrument. She will be playing Sonatas and Interludes for prepared piano by contemporary composer John Cage (1912-1992).

So, what in the world is a “prepared” piano? Very simply, a “prepared” piano is a piano that has had its sound modified by the insertion of small foreign objects between the strings of the instruments, such as screws, nuts, bolts, weather stripping, pieces of felt, paper, wood and rubber. The concept was created and used by Cage and is strictly a contemporary convention. George Crumb (b. 1929) expanded on Cage's idea by using other techniques to modify the piano sound such as muting a string with the finger or by placing a metal chain over the strings.

Although this is a contemporary technique, piano builders have been working to manipulate the sounds coming from their pianos for centuries, mainly by modifying the sound of the piano through its pedals. The left pedal in the modern piano (called “una corda,” or “one string”) modifies the sound of the piano by not only making it softer but also mellower. Some 19th-century pianos had seven pedals, each creating a different effect. This included the insertion (activated by the pedal) of parchment paper or cloth between the hammers and the strings. Some of these pianos even had bells (again, activated by a pedal), which enabled the performer to “accompany” him/herself when playing marches and other suitable compositions.

Decker  and Weiss Exhibit at Alma Mater

There is a stunning new exhibition at the IPFW Visual Arts Gallery featuring Department of Fine Arts adjunct faculty Patricia Weiss and Derek Decker. Derek Decker and Patricia Weiss: Ceramics and Painting continues through February 10, 2013.

These two superb artists share much in common. Decker and Weiss are artists who both received their B.F.A. from IPFW. Both deeply appreciated the variety of mediums they learned to use in their undergraduate program and credit IPFW’s B.F.A. program for helping them establish a direction for their work. Both artists explore aspects of contemporary life through the representations of common objects in still life: Decker in 3D, as a sculptor using ceramic slip casting, and Weiss in 2D, painting in oil.

While many artists struggle to find relevance, Weiss and Decker have zeroed in on universal themes. Their work is thought provoking, yet innocent. “I have my own feelings behind each piece, thoughts about what the mess left behind by manufacturing and consumerism is doing to the environment,” said Decker. “But, I don’t to try to influence people  how to think, I just want them to be aware.”

 “All of my pieces carry a little part of me, in my exploration of surface texture and finish and in the content,” Decker explained. “The objects themselves are things that I have had a lot of contact with. I used to work with concrete and the jackhammer is something I used a lot.”

Decker was thinking about the difficulty of that job when he heard about the 99% movement. “I was thinking about that and about the movement of paper by bankers and what they were getting away with, in juxtaposition to the difficulties faced by the other 99% of the people.”  

Decker’s work is a version of 3D photo-realism. To get a realistic finish on clay that looks like a weathered piece of iron isn’t easy. Decker uses whatever materials he thinks will give him a believable surface finish. “I use some glazes, a little enamel paint, some sanding, whatever it takes,” said Decker.

Patricia Weiss uses images of home and hospitality to speak about the deeper parts of life.  She paints the bigger issues through the little things common to each of us. Weiss’s work hints at just how devastating a tempest in a teapot can be and tells us at the same time not to let things get to us so much.

Weiss likes to comb through resale shops looking for cups to use in still life that have interesting handles. “I like that they are so much like us,” said Weiss, “Functioning so differently and so much the same.”

“I don’t set out to present a prescribed theme,” Weiss explained. “ I just start setting up and working, pulling the things together that seem to be speaking to me at the time, then, as I work, the meaning of the piece starts to rise to the surface.”

Weiss is extremely careful in her mixing of forms and colors. “Color theory is one of the things I studied in my M.F.A. program,” said Weiss. “The use of color is important if you want to create a particular kind of atmosphere in a painting. I try to be careful not to overwhelm the viewer. Even if I’m presenting something a bit dark I toss in something light to try to counter balance the weight of that darkness.”

Weiss receive her M.F.A. in painting from the Art Institute of Boston, Boston, Mass., in 2008. Decker received his M.F.A. in Ceramics from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, in 2012. Both have returned to IPFW to teach. Weiss teaches 2D design and drawing. Decker teaches slip casting.

Students in the Fringe

The first annual Fort Wayne Fringe Festival will feature two IPFW Department of Music students when it debuts this weekend at Wunderkammer Company located at 3402 Fairfield Avenue in the former Casa D’Angelo location.  Singer/songwriter and pianist Hope Arthur will debut music from her upcoming album when she and her orchestra take the stage.  An eclectic mix of classical piano, quirky accordion and sounds of the orchestra set her music apart.  Arthur is a senior Music and an Outside Field major at IPFW. 

A member of the IPFW guitar ensemble, Kurt Roembke’s studies focus on music technology at IPFW.  He will perform an original piece entitled Hunting Mushrooms at the Fort Wayne Fringe Festival.  The piece originally started as an homage to John Cage’s score for Jackson MacLow’s play The Marrying Maiden.  This unspoken word performance relies on rearranging and manipulating recorded sound.  Tickets are only $5 for each performance.  More information can be found at http://fwfringe.tumblr.com/

Prize-Winning Piano Student                     

The Fort Wayne Philharmonic Youth Symphony Orchestra announced Caleb Stuckey as the winner of their recent concerto audition held Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013. Stuckey performed Edvard Grieg’s Concerto in A Minor and will perform it again April 28, 2013 with the Youth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by David Cooke.

Stuckey, who is homeschooled and takes private music instruction from Dr. Hamilton Tescarollothrough the IPFW Community Arts Academy (CAA), also was the third place winner in the Junior Division (ages 13-15) of the first annual Gene Marcus Piano Competition.  He was one of 12 prize winners from the competition held in the Rhinhart Recital Hall at the IPFW campus on June 17, 2012. 

Stuckey’s performance with the Youth Symphony Orchestra will be April 28, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in the Auer Performance Hall.  Tickets will be available at the door and are $5 for adults and free for children ages 18 and under.

Confluence Premiere in Argentina

Audi, Rytkowski and Tescarollo 

Buenos Aires, Argentina and the College Music Society’s International Conference was the summer destination for two music faculty members where Confluence, the new composition for cello and piano written by Chris Rutkowski for the Audi-Tescarollo Duo received an international premiere. 

The work written by Rutkowski, clinical assistant professor of music composition and technology, was inspired by the confluence of the three rivers in downtown Fort Wayne, and performed by pianist Hamilton Tescarollo, associate professor of music and director of keyboard studies at IPFW, and cellist Carlos Audi in June in Buenos Aires. The piece was performed at the La Usina del Arte, a converted electricity-generating plant and one of the city’s most sought-after concert venues.

The Audi-Tescarollo Duo, which specializes in South American music, also was selected to present the program entitled Hidden Gems of Brazilian Music during this prestigious conference from more than 200 proposals submitted by international artists and scholars. The performance took place at the Borges Cultural Center, Auditorio Piazzolla, in downtown Buenos Aires.

Vernon Releases Two CDs

Associate Professor Farrell Vernon recently released two CDs through Centaur Records. Convergence: Sopranino Saxophone Across the Centuries (CRC3252) and Sempre Saxophone Quartet: Music of William Schmidt, (CRC3262) are both available on Amazon and iTunes. Convergence was recorded with a number of musical artists associated with the IPFW Department of Music including Melanie Bookout, viola da gamba; Brandon Ford, percussion; Laura Lydy, guitar, and Hamilton Tescarollo, piano.  Vernon is contracted to record two additional CDs with Centaur Records within the next two years.

Locke and Loaded Tour at IPFW 

Melanie BookoutMelanie Bookout, associate professor of music, has been rehearsing for six concerts all set for performance in fall 2013. Three of these concerts will be part of the Locke and Loaded tour, a collaboration between IPFW baroque gambists Melanie and Russell Bookout, Fort Wayne baroque soloists and New Comma Baroque. Locke and Loaded will feature English music spanning a period of great musical and political upheaval featuring works by Hely, Locke, Jenkins, Purcell, Simpson and Young.  Performances are scheduled for Indiana Wesleyan, Valparaiso University and IPFW on Saturday, September 14, at the Rhinehart Recital Hall at 2:30 p.m. Contact the IPFW Box Office at 260-481-6551 or www.ipfw.edu/tickets.

Blue Star Instruments Enhance Music Therapy
IPFW Associate Professor Dr. Nancy Jackson (l.) and Tammy Else of Lutheran Hospital appreciate the wealth of instruments donated by Blue Star.

Blue Star Instruments Enhance Music Therapy

Nancy Jackson, IPFW associate professor of music and director of music therapy will be facilitating a new music therapy practicum program at Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne. Music therapy students enrolled in Practicum III will be placed at Lutheran to complete their clinical training course requirements. The program, which begins in January 2013, will offer an excellent opportunity for IPFW’s music therapy students to gain real-world experience in the application of music therapy.

The collaboration began as a conversation at a 2011 conference, sponsored by Erin’s House for Grieving Children, between Jackson and Tammy Else, child life specialist at Lutheran Children’s Hospital, has found additional support in the form of a donation of musical instruments from Blue Star Connection, which will help Jackson’s students with their work at Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

“The IPFW students who would go to Lutheran would be enrolled in clinical training practice,” said Jackson. “Most likely it would be the most advanced level of practicum they would do before going out to do a full-time internship somewhere. It will provide a really good balance of getting some independent work in while still having close supervision.”

Caroline Johnson of Blue Star, a nonprofit organization that raises money to facilitate music programs for children in need, contacted Else not long after the program had been created. After a second conversation with John Catt, founder of Blue Star, Jackson and Else received a shipment of keyboards, kazoos, guitars, recorders and percussion instruments.

Jackson’s students are currently involved as interns at Park Center, area schools, Turnstone Center for Disabled Children and Adults, as well as long-term patient care facilities throughout the Fort Wayne area.

 

Colleagues Become New Leaders 

The College of Visual and Performing Arts is pleased to welcome current colleagues in their new administrative roles.  Dr. Barbara Resch, professor of music, will serve as the new chair of the Department of Music and Craig A. Humphrey, associate professor of theatre will serve as the interim chair of the Department of Theatre for the 2013-14 academic year. 

Dr. Resch began her tenure as chair of the Department of Music on July 1 and has served most recently as the director of music education.  Resch received the B. Mus. in organ performance from Valparaiso University, M.F.A. in musicology from Syracuse University and D.M.E. from Indiana University. Resch has been a full-time faculty member at IPFW since 1995 and served as associate dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts from 2007 - 2013. She has also helped to steer the direction of music education policy at both the state and the national levels through her position as president of the Indiana Music Education Association (IMEA).

As president of IMEA, Barbara Resch led a delegation to Washington D.C., meeting with Indiana’s representatives and senators to discuss the concerns of music educators and the role of accreditation in public education. Also, having been president of IMEA, Resch is familiar with all of the music programs offered across the state. “We have a music program at IPFW that is second to none in the state of Indiana. I’m so proud of the education our students receive at IPFW,” said Resch. 

As chair, Resch wants to discover even more about her music colleagues to better understand their areas of research, interest and expertise so that the department can better promote their talented faculty. “IPFW has a great music faculty, a great talent pool. I want to be sure that we are using their expertise,” Resch explained. “I am finding out more about the University and how to affect change. I want to make things work for our department and to make the department more viable to the community of Fort Wayne.”  Visit Dr. Resch's faculty page.

Craig A. Humphrey is the director of design technology and resident costume designer for the Department of Theatre and holds a M.F.A .in Costume Design from the University of Massachusetts and a B.F.A. in Acting from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Along with his teaching and administrative duties, he will direct the department’s production of Into the Woods in April.

Humphrey came to IPFW in 1991 from the University of Mississippi, where he served for three years as assistant professor of costume design. During his many years at IPFW he has taught a wide range of courses in a variety of areas. He regularly teaches courses in costume design, period styles for the theatre, American musical theatre, musical theatre performance, make-up, fundamentals of performance and textual analysis.  The university will conduct a nation-wide search for a new chair for the Department of Theatre to replace John O’Connell who was promoted to the dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Visit Craig Humphrey's faculty page.

Jazz Combo Invited to Play in NYC

Jazz Combo Invited to Play in NYC

The jazz combo Postmodern Prohibition was invited to perform at the New York City Jazz Festival held April 18-21. Sponsored by Sweetwater Sound, which helped finance the trip, the group (also known as the Sweetwater Jazz Project) includes two IPFW music majors, sophomores Evan Gidley on sax and Travis Lyons on guitar, and two high school seniors, Leland Nelson on bass from Canterbury High School and Sean Christian Parr on drum set from Carroll High School.

Postmodern was one of only ten groups selected to play at the festival. Other festival performers included four big bands from high schools and a middle school from California, Florida, New Jersey and Canada, along with five vocal jazz ensembles from high schools and a small university. They performed in the Allen Room located in Jazz at Lincoln Center, located on the fifth floor of the Time Warner building, overlooking Columbus Circle and Central Park.

“The entire experience was very memorable,” reflected Gidley, “and it was a ton of fun to finally go after all of the hours spent playing gigs around town to make the money we needed to pay our portion of the trip.”

Other highlights of their trip included listening to live jazz at Birdland and the Jazz Standard jazz club, participating in a clinic by a local jazz pianist David Berkham and attending a Q&A session with John Fedchock, a trombonist from NYC, and Janis Siegal, one of the members of the renowned vocal jazz group, the Manhattan Transfer. The festival concluded with a concert featuring Fedchock’s big band and Siegal singing with members of the vocal jazz ensembles, followed by a midnight cruise on the New York Harbor for the festival’s participants.

Haritun’s Love Affair with Music

Rosalie Haritun, associate professor of musicMusic has been the major love of Rosalie Haritun’s life; and even into her upcoming retirement, she has plans that continue to center around music. Rosalie Haritun, associate professor of music, will be retiring at the end of spring semester 2013 after serving as a member of the Department of Music faculty since 1988. “When I first came to IPFW my classes were held in the Liberal Arts Building in the basement,” recalled Haritun, “That’s been a few years, 25 years to be exact.”

After receiving her Bachelor in Music Education from Baldwin-Wallace Conservatory in Berea, Ohio, Haritun earned an M.S. from the University of Illinois and earned an Ed.D. from Columbia University in New York City. During her tenure at IPFW she has served as the Department of Music chair and as coordinator of music education, along with teaching music education and music appreciation courses.

Music for the Listener is a general education course that helps students listen to music with a critical ear. Classical music can be a bit intimidating to many, but Haritun has worked to make it accessible to literally thousands of students in her 25 years at IPFW. “I love classical music. I always have. I feel like a musical missionary and I believe everyone has the ability to enjoy classical music if someone opens them up to the possibility,” said Haritun.

To help guide new music educators, Haritun wrote the Music Teachers Survival Guide: Practical Techniques & Materials for Elementary Music Classroom, Parker Publishing, in 1994. She also has been a field editor for Prentice Hall textbooks since 2002 and has plans to continue that work into the future. “I had been teaching music education classes for a few years and saving all my lesson plans,” explained Haritun. “One day I realized I had this huge stack of them and I thought, well that’s enough to pull a book together. So I did.”

Haritun has loved music her entire life and has been in a classroom either as a student or teacher since she was five years old. “I can remember when I was little, I took a stick and I pounded a few nails in it and I would pretend that it was an instrument. I’d sit out on the front porch pretending to play that thing lifting my fingers up and down on those nails,” Haritun recalled.

She went on to learn to play several instruments including clarinet and trombone. She had considered becoming a professional musician, but fell in love with teaching along the way. “I really could swing that trombone though,” said Haritun with a laugh.

While Haritun grew up in New York and still owns a home there, she plans to stay in Fort Wayne. “It’s where my friends are, where my community is. I haven’t really planned the rest out,” said Haritun. “I never really had the chance to travel; I’d like to do some of that.”

The Department of Music has planned a reception in honor of Dr. Haritun Monday, April 29, from 6 – 7:30 p.m. in the Auer lobby prior to the Community Orchestra Concert, which starts at 7:30 p.m. Friends, colleagues, students and former students are invited to visit with Dr. Haritun to wish her well. For more information call the Department of Music at 481-6714.

SmartARTS ~ Take Five

SmartARTS ~ Take Five

What do you think of when you hear the words “take five?” Do you think of a candy bar? Or maybe a well-deserved break? For millions of people these words are forever linked to a jaunty syncopated tune written by Paul Desmond, alto saxophonist for the David Brubeck Quartet. The group recorded the tune on what would become a landmark recording, Time Out, in 1959.

Take Five, written in 5/4 time was the antithesis of all pop music held sacred at the time: three minutes, three verses and 4/4 time. To this day it is one of Brubeck’s most popular recordings, selling more than five million copies. On March 18 the IPFW Faculty Jazz Combo will present A Tribute to the Music of Dave Brubeck.

The music of David Brubeck, who died in December 2012 at the age of 91, was hugely popular in the 1950s and the 1960s. Those too young to remember the era might be current fans of the AMC period drama Mad Men, which harkens back to the ’60s or TV Land’s nostalgic hits like The Dick Van Dyke Show. The ’60s also are remembered for the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, John F. Kennedy and the Vietnam War. During these years Brubeck made history not only with his music, but also by standing up to a number of college deans who asked him not to perform with racially mixed bands when performing at their colleges.

As a child Brubeck was forbidden to listen to music on the radio. His mother believed that if you wanted to hear music, you should play it. As a result Brubeck and his brothers played a variety of instruments at early ages. Born cross-eyed, Brubeck learned to play by ear because sight reading was almost impossible for him. Despite his poor eyesight Brubeck graduated from the College of the Pacific at Stockton, Cal., with a bachelor of music in 1942. Upon graduation Brubeck joined the U.S. Army, and served in northeast France during WWII, where Brubeck’s prowess as a musician was noticed by a commanding officer. It was decided that Brubeck’s skills would best be used as a military musician backing USO performers.

The IPFW Jazz Faculty Combo will be performing arrangements of great Brubeck jazz classics including Take Five, The Unsquare Dance, Blue Rondo ala Turk and Three To Get Ready on March 18 at 7:30 p.m. in the Rhinehart Recital Hall. Admission is $7 and under with IPFW students and children 10 and under admitted free. For information call the IPFW Box Office at 260-481-6555 or purchase tickets online.

seven-foot Steinway “prepared” piano

SmartARTS

On Feb. 13, 2013, when guest artist Kate Boyd sits down at 7:30 p.m. to perform at the seven-foot Steinway "prepared" piano in Rhinehart Recital Hall, she will perform some of the most avant-garde, manipulated music most of us ever have heard coming from this time-honored instrument. She will be playing Sonatas and Interludes for prepared piano by contemporary composer John Cage (1912-1992).

So, what in the world is a “prepared” piano? Very simply, a “prepared” piano is a piano that has had its sound modified by the insertion of small foreign objects between the strings of the instruments, such as screws, nuts, bolts, weather stripping, pieces of felt, paper, wood and rubber. The concept was created and used by Cage and is strictly a contemporary convention.  George Crumb (b. 1929) expanded on Cage's idea by using other techniques to modify the piano sound such as muting a string with the finger or by placing a metal chain over the strings.

Although this is a contemporary technique, piano builders have been working to manipulate the sounds coming from their pianos for centuries, mainly by modifying the sound of the piano through its pedals. The left pedal in the modern piano (called “una corda,” or “one string”) modifies the sound of the piano by not only making it softer but also mellower. Some 19th-century pianos had seven pedals, each creating a different effect. This included the insertion (activated by the pedal) of parchment paper or cloth between the hammers and the strings. Some of these pianos even had bells (again, activated by a pedal), which enabled the performer to “accompany” him/herself when playing marches and other suitable compositions.

To find out more about Boyd’s upcoming performance visit http://new.ipfw.edu/calendar/event-detail.html?id=1a0a0338-4665-4297-bf94-cb1d45b15d40

Hope Arthur and Her Orchestra

Students In The Fringe

The first annual Fort Wayne Fringe Festival will feature two IPFW Department of Music students when it debuts this weekend at Wunderkammer Company located at 3402 Fairfield Avenue in the former Casa D’Angelo location. Singer/songwriter and pianist Hope Arthur will debut music from her upcoming album when she and her orchestra take the stage. An eclectic mix of classical piano, quirky accordion and sounds of the orchestra set her music apart. Arthur is a senior Music and an Outside Field major at IPFW. 

A member of the IPFW guitar ensemble, Kurt Roembke’s studies focus on music technology at IPFW.  He will perform an original piece entitled Hunting Mushrooms at the Fort Wayne Fringe Festival.  The piece originally started as an homage to John Cage’s score for Jackson MacLow’s play The Marrying Maiden.  This unspoken word performance relies on rearranging and manipulating recorded sound.  Tickets are only $5 for each performance.  More information can be found at http://fwfringe.tumblr.com/

Hope Arthur and Her Orchestra

  • Thursday, Jan. 31 at 10 p.m.
  • Sunday, Feb. 3 at 8:15 p.m. 

Hunting Mushrooms by Kurt Roembke

  • Saturday, Feb. 2 at 3:15 p.m.
  • Sunday, Feb. 3 at 3:15 p.m.

Prize-Winning Piano Students

Prize-Winning Piano Student

The Fort Wayne Philharmonic Youth Symphony Orchestra announced Caleb Stuckey as the winner of their recent concerto audition held Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013. Stuckey performed Edvard Grieg’s Concerto in A Minor and will perform it again April 28, 2013, with the Youth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by David Cooke.

Stuckey, who is homeschooled and takes private music instruction from Dr. Hamilton Tescarollo through the IPFW Community Arts Academy (CAA), also was the third place winner in the Junior Division (ages 13-15) of the first annual Gene Marcus Piano Competition.  He was one of 12 prize winners from the competition held in the Rhinhart Recital Hall at the IPFW campus on June 17, 2012. 

Stuckey’s performance with the Youth Symphony Orchestra will be April 28, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in the Auer Performance Hall.  Tickets will be available at the door and are $5 for adults and free for children ages 18 and under.

Outstanding Arts Educator
Trentacosti at work during the IPFW Summer String Camp.

Outstanding Arts Educator

Marcy Trentacosti, IPFW adjunct faculty, IPFW Community Arts Academy instructor and Fort Wayne Philharmonic violinist, has received a 2012 Artie Award from the Arts United in Fort Wayne. Artie Awards were presented at the Bravo Celebration on Wednesday, November 7, 2012, at the Arts United Center.  Nominated by the Fort Wayne Philharmonic, Trentacosti received the Magaret Ann Keegan Award for Outstanding Arts Educator.

Trentacosti has been a musician in the Fort Wayne Philharmonic for the past 36 years and has taught at IPFW and through the IPFW Community Arts Academy for 17 of those years. During that time she has taught violin to hundreds of children throughout our region with individual lessons and her annual IPFW Strings Camp each summer.  Attracting nearly 50 students each year, these young musicians receive one-on-one and group instruction as well as coaching by Philharmonic musicians, all culminating in a concert at the end of the week.

Trentacosti is also the conductor of the Philharmonic Youth Concert Orchestra, a program that she started from scratch in 2010. In the first year, Trentacosti assembled an orchestra of 41 young muscians, doubling the size of their youth symphony program.  In the first year, she also started a chamber music program for the Youth Concert Orchestra musicians in addition to coordinating three joint concerts with the Youth Symphony.

The Artie Awards are designed to honor individuals and organizations that serve as champions for arts and culture in the Greater Fort Wayne area.  Click here for more information about the 2013 Summer String Camp.

 John and Ruth Rhinehart Music Center
The Auer Lobby of the IPFW Rhinehart Music Center.

Architectural Design Wins Merit Award

Fort Wayne-based SchenkelShultz Architecture and Brenner Design of Indianapolis have won a merit award for interior design for their design of the John and Ruth Rhinehart Music Center. The award was given by American Institute of Architects (AIA) as part of an annual design competition. AIA’s panel of judges described the interior of  Rhinehart as elegant simplicity.

The IPFW John and Ruth Rhinehart Music Center was designed to serve the university and the community. Visually exciting, the building was created with glass-prismed piano studios, a conference room and lobbies that provide exquisite space for learning and interaction, with panoramic views of the IPFW Arts Plaza and the heart of the campus. It features a 250-seat recital hall, classrooms, studios, administrative offices and a 1,500-seat auditorium.