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Gardner math event 2015

The IPFW Department of Mathematical Sciences and the PI Math Club presents:

A Celebration of the Mathematical Mind

An afternoon of recreational mathematical topics, paradoxes, and puzzles -

inspired by Martin Gardner and his Mathematical Games and the Celebration of Mind festivals

Friday, November 13, 2015

IPFW Kettler Hall room 246  - Free, and Open to the Public!

Photo page for this event

Printable Poster: PDF

Schedule (you are welcome to come and go to any particular activity)

Some events may be located in different Kettler rooms (KT 216, 218,...) but there will be signs posted.

  • 12:00-12:10 Welcome  -  and a historical introduction to Martin Gardner
  • 12:10-1:00 A talk on Geometry and Gerrymandering, by Prof. Rick Gillman, Valparaiso University
  • 1:00 Lunch
  • 1:30-2:10 A presentation and board game activity, The Resistance, by Prof. Derek Thompson, Taylor University
  • 2:15-2:40 Your Vote Counts - The Science and Technology of Elections and Voting Systems, by Prof. Jay Bagga, Ball State University
  • 2:45-3:10 Voting Paradoxes, by Prof. Marc Lipman, IPFW
  • 3:15 More food and/or games

Program

Geometry and Gerrymandering, by Prof. Rick Gillman, Valparaiso University R. Gillman
Gerrymandering of political districts is historically recognized by the extremely contorted boundaries of the districts. This talk describes various geometric methods used to measure this contortion while also telling the history and future of gerrymandering. It draws on a case study involving the Indiana state legislature to draw out some of the political implications of gerrymandering.
The Resistance, by Prof. Derek Thompson, Taylor University Presentation by D. Thompson at IPFW
A common logical fallacy is to base a valid argument on false premises - that is, the argument is valid but not sound. This concept is the crux of the board game The Resistance, a game of "social deduction" where the players know their own identity but not the identities of the other players. After playing the game, we will work through examples of situations where logical arguments can be made, and emphasize the difference between a valid and sound argument.
Your Vote Counts - The Science and Technology of Elections and Voting Systems, Jay Bagga, Professor of Computer Science, Ball State University, and Co-Director, State of Indiana Voting Systems Technical Oversight Program (VSTOP)

voting clip art

In 2002 the US Congress passed a law called the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) with the goals of making sweeping reforms to the country’s voting process. HAVA’s mandate included upgrading of the voting equipment used in elections. There are elaborate procedures in place for testing and certifying election systems for use in local, state and federal elections.

We give a brief account of the history of voting machines used in US elections. We discuss some aspects of the science and technology of elections and voting machines. We conclude with a discussion of some future directions.

Vote! Your Vote Matters!
Vote! Your Vote is Important!
Vote! Your Vote Counts!
Maybe

Prof. Marc Lipman

voting clip art
We’ll look at how we conduct an election, what we’d like to happen when we do, and what might actually happen. We’ll look at how we assign votes to groups, what we’d like to have happen when we do, and what might actually happen. Maybe we’ll even vote on something.

The following day, Saturday, Nov. 14, is the Science and Society at IPFW event (SASI), 11:00-3:00: in the Walb Ballroom, and with various campus tours.