College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Richard Weiner

Dr. Richard WeinerRichard H. Weiner, Professor and Chair
E-mail: weinerr@ipfw.edu
Office:
LA207
Office Hours: Tuesday & Thursday 10:00 am - 12:00 pm 
Phone: 260-481-6692

Richard Weiner earned his BA in History from the University of Massachusetts and his MA and PhD (1999) from the University of California, Irvine.

He is Associate Editor of Reviews for Enterprise and Society: The International Journal of Business History (History majors Jessie Cortesi and Cody Fuelling work as his Book Review Editor Assistants). If you have questions regarding the book review section of the journal please contact him (weinerr@ipfw.edu) or Jessie Cortesi (cortjl01@ipfw.edu).  If you prefer regular mail, his address is: Richard Weiner, Indiana/Purdue University Fort Wayne, Dept. of History, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., Fort Wayne, IN 46805.

 

Research Interests:

His research examines Mexico over the entire national period, with a concentration on intellectual and cultural history, particularly on ideas about social and economic development. He is currently working on two projects. One traces the evolution of discussions and debates about “Mexico’s Legendary Wealth” over the national era, and is provisionally titled Narratives of Wealth and Poverty: a Cultural History of the Mexican Economy.  The other, a coauthored project with José Enrique Covarrubias, is provisionally titled An Economic Companion to Alexander von Humboldt’s Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain.


Publications:

Books

  • Richard Weiner, Francisco Altable, Edward Beatty, and José Enrique Covarrubias, El mito de una riqueza proverbial. Ideas, utopías y proyectos económicos en torno a México en los siglos XVIII y XIX. Mexico: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Investigaciones Históricas, 2015.
  • Richard Weiner and Raúl Galoppe, eds. Explorations on Subjectivity, Borders, and Demarcations: A Fine Line. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2005.
  • Richard Weiner, Race, Nation, and Market: Economic Culture in Porfirian Mexico. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004.

Book Chapters and Journal Articles

  • “Mexico and Central America,” in The Routledge Handbook to the History of Global Economic Thought, Vincent Barnett, ed., pp. 240-248. London: Routledge, 2015.
  • “Antecedents to Daniel Cosío Villegas’ Post-Revolutionary Ideology: Justo Sierra’s Critique of Mexico’s Legendary Wealth and Trinidad Sánchez Santos’ Assault on Porfirian Progress.” Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos 30: 1 (Winter 2014): 71-103.
  • “La riqueza legendaria de México: lectura selectiva del legado del Ensayo de Humboldt. In Economía, ciencia y política. Estudios sobre Alexander von Humboldt a 200 años del Ensayo político sobre el reino de la Nueva España, edited by José Enrique Covarrubias and Matilde Souto Mantecón, pp. 261-291 (Mexico City: UNAM/Instituto Mora, 2012).
  • “Charles Conant’s Theory of Surplus Capital and Mexico in the American Imagination: Preliminary Observations on American Expansionist Visions during the Age of Empire.” História e Economia 10:1(August 2012): 111-131.
  • “Globalization, Past and Present: Is History Repeating Itself?,” World History Bulletin  28: 1 (April 2012): 32-38. 
  • “The Scramble for Mexico and Alexander von Humboldt’s Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain.” World History Connected 7: 3 (October, 2010). <http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/7.3/weiner.html>  
  • (Co-authored with José Enrique Covarrubias) “Political Economy, Alexander von Humboldt, and Mexico’s Revolutions of 1810 and 1910.” Rupkatha Journal 2: 3 (September, 2010): 220-246.
  • “Economic thought and culture in revolutionary Mexico: Carlos Díaz Dufoo’s Critique of the Humboldtian idea of Mexico’s legendary wealth.” História e Economia 2: 1 (2nd Semestre, 2006): 13-31.
  • “Redefining Mexico’s Riches: Representations of Wealth in Alexander von Humboldt’s Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain.” In Humboldt y otros viajeros científicos en América Latina, edited by Lourdes de Ita Rubio and Sánchez Díaz, pp. 157-170. Morelia: Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, 2006.
  • “Latin America and De-centering World History.” World History Bulletin 22:2 (fall, 2006): 6-8. <http://www.thewha.org/bulletins/fall_2006.pdf>
  • “Blurred Boundaries: Porfirian Mexico and the International Division of Labor.” In Explorations in Subjectivity, Borders, and Demarcations: A Fine Line, edited by Raúl Galoppe and Richard Weiner, pp. 69-87. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2005.
  •  “El declive económico de México en el siglo XIX: una perspectiva cultural.” Signos Históricos 12 (July-December 2004): 68-93
  • “Trinidad Sánchez Santos: Voice of the Catholic Opposition in Porfirian Mexico.” Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos 17: 2 (2001): 321-348. 
  • “Battle for Survival: Porfirian Views of the International Marketplace.” Journal of Latin American Studies 32:2(2000): 645-70.
  • “Competing Market Discourses in Porfirian Mexico.” Latin American Perspectives 26: 1(1999): 44-64.

Encyclopedia Articles

  • Co-authored with Alexander Allison, “Chile,” in Women’s Lives Around the World: Volume 2: the Americas (ABC-CLIO Greenwood Press, under contract).
  • Co-authored with Melissa Norton, “Mexico,” in Women’s Lives Around the World: Volume 2: the Americas (ABC-CLIO Greenwood Press, under contract).
  • “Dependency Theory,” SAGE Encyclopedia of World Poverty, 2nd ed., 2015.
  • Co-authored with Jessica Cortesi, “Andre Gunder Frank,” SAGE Encyclopedia of World Poverty, 2nd ed., 2015.
  • Co-authored with Alexander Allsion, “Immanuel Wallerstein,” SAGE Encyclopedia of World Poverty, 2nd ed., 2015.
  • “Liberalism: Latin America.” Encyclopedia of the Modern World, vol. 4, pp. 506-509. Oxford University Press, 2008.

 

Courses:

Fall 2017

HIST H105 American History to 1877 

HIST J495 Senior Seminar: Latin America In Foreign Eyes


Spring 2018

-HIST F346 Modern Mexico

-HIST H105 American History to 1877