Celebrate 50 Years
Honors Program

Course Information

Courses

Fall 2014 Course Descriptions are listed below:

  • Honors Omnibus Ideas and Human Experience
  • Honors Citizenship and Global Affairs ***Brand New Course Created for the Honors Program***
  • Honors Communicating with Statistics *First Time Offering through the Honors Program*
  • Honors Western World Masterpieces I: Love and War *First Time Offering through the Honors Program*
  • Honors History of Modern Drama *First Time Offering through the Honors Program*
  • Honors Intermediate Expository Writing *Updated Course Offering*
  • Honors Analytic Geometry & Calculus *Updated Course Offering*
  • Honors Ethics *Updated Course Offering*
  • Honors Elementary Psychology
  • Honors Independent Study (Honors Project)



Honors Omnibus Ideas and Human Experience

13430 HON H101-01H | TBA | 1.0 cr.
Instructor: Dr. Ann Livschiz

This class revolves around the Omnibus Lecture Series and offers students the opportunity to attend lectures given by nationally known speakers and enhances that experience with a variety of activities. We will explicitly examine areas where we agree or respectfully disagree with the speakers and our class members using personal experiences; information from a variety of scholarly, peer-reviewed sources; and theories from our various academic disciplines. Guest speakers with expertise in the speakers’ fields may lead discussions prior to the lectures, and will lead a Socratic discussion after the lectures. An Internet dialogue via Blackboard will allow students to present an objective analysis to peers and engage in civil intellectual discourse in written form. There are 10 meetings in all for the course throughout the semester, consisting of an introductory meeting with the Honors Program director and Graduate Assistant as well as meetings with special guests and faculty. Class meetings will last approximately one hour, and lectures will last approximately 1.5 hours.

 

 

Honors Citizenship and Global Affairs

***Brand New Course Created for the Honors Program***

14321  HON H201-01H  |  TR  | 9:00 AM – 10:15 AM  |  LA 210  |  3.0 cr.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioural Ways of Knowing (B.5) General Education Requirement (Note: this does not yet show up in Oasis)

Instructor: Dr. James Toole (Political Science)

For better or worse, we live in a globalized world. In this course we ask how, and to what degree, globalization has created rights and responsibilities that transcend national borders. What does it mean to be a citizen in a globalized world? Are there rights to which people are entitled regardless of national laws or societal traditions? What responsibilities do we have toward societies other than our own? And what role should institutions such as states and international organizations have in shaping the rights and responsibilities of people around the world? 

 

 

Honors Communicating with Statistics

*First Time Offering through the Honors Program*

12194 STAT-12500-07H  |  TR  | 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM  |  KT G44  |  3.0 cr.

This Course fulfills the Quantitative Reasoning Foundational Intellectual Skills (A.3) General Education Requirement (or Area I under the Old General Education Program)

Instructor: Dr. Chand K. Chauhan

The major goal of the proposed honors course is to provide students opportunities to learn, explore, and investigate the basic concepts of statistics by hands on activities and discussions.  Besides learning the formulas and statistical procedures, students will discuss and investigate issues such as: Why we do what we do; Are there alternative methods, and if so, how good and practical are those methods? Students will share their findings with other students, and will become effective conveyer of the statistical results in simpler words.

Minitab will be introduced and simulation will be used for many activities.  

 

 

Honors Western World Masterpieces I: Love and War

*First Time Offering through the Honors Program*

11770 ENG-L101-01H | MWF | 11:00 AM – 11:50 AM | LA 136 | 3.0 cr

This course fulfills the Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing (B.6) General Education Requirement (or Area IV under the old General Education Program)

Instructor: Dr. Damian Fleming

‘In our days,' continued Vera--mentioning 'our days' as people of limited intelligence are fond of doing, imagining that they have discovered and appraised the peculiarities of "our days" and that human characteristics change with the times.
--Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

The value of the study of ancient and medieval literature—the necessary subject matter of ENG L101 Western World Masterpieces—is predicated at least in part on the notion elaborated by Tolstoy above that human experiences retain some fundamental characteristics throughout time. Thus the struggles and conflicts delineated in a 3000-year-old work like the Iliad, for example, can continue to teach even 21st century students lessons about human behavior.

The honors version of this course will focus on two of the most important—and similarly devastating—themes of human experience: Love and War. Starting with the Iliad—and progressing through Shakespeare’s Othello—we will examine how these canonical texts treat the issues of Love and War, often in tandem. What is often shocking to students approaching this literature for the first time is the stark, bitter, and cruel depictions of war. These ancient authors did not glorify war by any means. Similarly contradictory is the range of depictions of love—from that of a soldier for his “war-bride” (a slave), to genuine mutual romantic attachment, as well as the devastating destructive power of love.

The thematic focus of this honors course will be located within the traditional goals of this General Education course: nurturing close reading, articulating concepts orally, and careful formal writing.

 

 

Honors History of Modern Drama

*First Time Offering through the Honors Program*

14319 THTR 32510-01H | TR | 3:00 PM – 4:15 PM | MCB 127 | 3.0 cr

This course fulfills the Interdisciplinary and Creative Ways of Knowing (B.7) General Education Requirment

Instructor: Dr. Jeffrey Casazza

Students will explore a wide variety of theatrical styles developed since 1879 comprising modern drama including realism and the breaks from realism to discover their origins in society, culture and historical events and their effects on contemporary drama. Students will develop skills in script analysis and interpretation and apply them to various theatrical texts, recorded media and live production.

The overall theme is the society in which we live and how it influences theatre and how theatre influences (or can influence) society. Our overall culture is examined as is the various "time periods" between 1879 and today and why the theatre of those periods came into being and how/why some of the techniques used in those periods are still used today in our much more technologically advanced society.



Honors Intermediate Expository Writing

*Updated Course Offering*

14123 ENG-W233-01H | MWF | 11:00 AM –11:50 AM | LA 232 | 3.0 cr.

Prerequisite: English W131 or its equivalent.
This Course fulfills the Written Communication Foundational Intellectual Skills (A.1) General Education Requirement.

Instructor: Dr. Stevens Amidon

This course connects the theories and practices of academic research with the practice of academic writing. In this course you will examine the research conventions of your chosen academic discipline, and pursue a research project that will culminate in a research paper or other research product appropriate to that discipline. This is a project-based course that will require you to work independently as a researcher, but also will encourage you to use the services of IPFW's research librarians.



Honors Analytic Geometry & Calculus

*Updated Course Offering*

13302 MA-16500-03H | MW | 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM | KT 218 | 4.0 cr.
TR | 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM | KT 218

Prerequisite: MA 154 or MA 159 with a grade of C or higher or placement by departmental exam.
This Course fulfills the Quantitative Reasoning Foundational Intellectual Skills (A.3) General Education Requirement.

Instructor: Dr. I. Daniel Coroian


This is a rigorous look at Calculus with plenty of applications from physics, engineering, natural and social sciences, finance, etc. You will work in groups and individually on different writing and exploratory exercises. In addition to the regular lecture format we’ll use different application of the Computer Algebra System Maple in solving problems. Two projects, reflecting your background, will be assigned and the results of will be presented using your favourite media format. Creativity and originality is strongly encouraged.



Honors Ethics

*Updated Course Offering*

14221 PHIL-11100-06H | MW | 1:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. | KT 250 | 3.0 cr

This course fulfills the Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing (B.6) General Education Requirement (or Area IV under the old General Education Program)
Business majors in the Honors Program have priority registration for this course.

Instructor: Dr. Abe Schwab

We are all faced with ethical questions every day. What you consider right or of moral value might not be by someone else. How do we determine standards of right conduct? What are our moral responsibilities? This course will approach such questions both from a theoretical and practical point of view. The course will grapple with thorny problems such as: abortion, capital punishment, medical ethics, racial and gender discrimination, and war and peace. Ethical questions often overlap with legal, religious, social, and political issues. Students will be encouraged to discuss and defend their views, and develop their skills in critical analysis. Readings will be drawn from the works of such philosophers as Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and Hume. Several U.S. Supreme Court decisions will also be read.



Honors Elementary Psychology

14241 PSY 12000-12H | MW | 1:30 PM - 2:45PM | KT 243 | 3.0 cr

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioural Ways of Knowing (B.5) General Education Requirement (or Area III under the Old General Education Program)

Instructor: Dr. Daniel Miller

This course will take a scientific approach to the study of behavior and mental processes, including learning, memory, perception, brain-behavior interactions, personality, intelligence, mental disorders, and social influences on behavior. In addition, students will be actively involved in examining some controversial issues in contemporary psychology, e.g. are memories of sex abuse always real, does viewing television increase aggression in children, is homosexuality genetically determined, etc. Students will explore these issues using resources on the Web as well as assigned readings. The goals of the course are for students to understand knowledge about behavior acquired through the scientific method and to become critical evaluators of everyday information related to psychology.



Honors Independent Study (Honors Project)

13431 HON-H399-01H | TBA | 3.0 cr.

Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
If you are interested in signing up for this class, you should contact the Honors Program Director.
Instructor: Staff


The Honors Program capstone course is the Honors Project which provides an opportunity for honors students to undertake research under the guidance of a faculty mentor selected by the student. The format varies, but each project encourages intellectual independence and introduces students to proper research methods in preparation for graduate work. Projects must have some written component and will be a product which is representative of professional work in the chosen field. This project must be presented and defended before a committee including representatives of the Honors Program Council.