Celebrate 50 Years
Honors Program

Course Information

Courses

**To set up an appointment with the Honors Program Director for advisement on how the Honors Program courses can fit into your major and schedule, please visit: http://ipfwhonorsprogram.simplybook.me/. **


Spring 2015 Course Descriptions are listed below:

  • Honors Language and Global Diversity  ***Brand New Course Created for the Honors Program***
  • Honors Culture and Society *First Time Offering through the Honors Program*
  • Honors Introduction to Women's Studies *First Time Offering through the Honors Program*
  • Honors Bioanthropology *First Time Offering through the Honors Program*
  • Honors Great Debates: Introduction to Historical Communication *First Time Offering Course through the Honors Program*
  • Honors Religion and Culture *Updated Course Offering*
  • Honors Analytic Geometry & Calculus II *Updated Course Offering*
  • Honors Puzzles, Games, and Problems
  • Honors Independent Study (Honors Project)


Honors Language and Global Diversity

***Brand New Course Created for the Honors Program***

24235 HON H201-01H | TR | 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM | LB 211 | 3.0 cr.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioural Ways of Knowing (B.5) General Education Requirement. (Note: Gen Ed status for this course does not yet show up in Oasis)

Instructors: Dr. Shannon Bischoff (English & Linguistics), Farah Combs (Arabic--ILCS), Dr. Pam Britton Reese (CSD), Dr. Jens Clegg (Spanish—ILCS), Susan Anderson (Helmke Library)

Does language unite or divide? Is language just a political construct? Using the central concepts of bilingualism and multilingualism, students will explore issues such as identity, diversity, education, policy, colonialism, power, politics, family, language endangerment and the media. Further, students will explore how linguistic diversity is negotiated in contexts from home to the public world of the school, health care facilities and the courts as well as online, in public spaces and internationally.

 

Honors Culture and Society

*First Time Offering through the Honors Program*

22349 ANTH E105-01H  |  MWF  | 10:00 AM – 10:50 AM  |  LB 211  |  3.0 cr.

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioural Ways of Knowing (B.5) General Education Requirement (or Area III under the Old General Education Program).

Instructor: Dr. Noor Borbieva (Anthropology)

  • Are there any human universals?
  •  Is cultural diversity the primary driver of human conflict?
  •  How will globalization affect cultural diversity?
  •  Is culture just a mechanism for enforcing existing hierarchies of wealth and power?

These are only some of the profound questions we will explore in the honors section of E105, “Culture and Society” (an introduction to Cultural Anthropology). Students in the course can expect to question cherished assumptions they bring about the role culture plays in human life and explore how anthropological insights can make them better professionals and better global citizens. Because of its emphasis on writing and critical thinking, the honors section is particularly recommended for students who plan to pursue graduate study, regardless of discipline.

 

 

Honors Introduction to Women's Studies

*First Time Offering through the Honors Program*

23405 WOST 210-05H | TR | 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM | LB 211 | 3.0 cr

This course fulfills the Social and Behavioural Ways of Knowing (B.5) General Education Requirement.

Instructor: Dr. Janet Badia (Women's Studies)

This honors section of W210 will offer students the opportunity to explore theoretical arguments about the categories of sex and gender alongside discussions of the wide-range of institutions and media that shape contemporary women’s lives. To better grasp the significance of these arguments and discussions, we will ground our study of contemporary issues in an examination of material history and culture. That is to say, as we explore anthologized writings by feminist writers and women’s studies scholars, we will also consider important primary materials from the range of media to which these writings are often responding. This combination of work is designed to help you with the centerpieces of the class: a series of written analyses that ask you to investigate how women’s identities and women’s issues are constructed by the cultural artifacts that surround us, a researched paper that will allow you to delve further into how cultural artifacts construct women’s identities, and a hands-on activity that you will design and implement with your classmates.

 

 

Honors Bioanthropology

*First Time Offering through the Honors Program*

21002 ANTH B200-03H | TR | 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM | LB 211 | 3.0 cr

This course fulfills the Scientific Ways of Knowing (B.4) General Education Requirement (or Area II under the Old General Education Program).

Instructor: Dr. Richard Sutter (Anthropology)

  • Why do humans look so different from one another?
  • How and why do people vary?
  • What are our fossil roots?
  • What can we know about ourselves by studying our primate relatives?

This course is a broad overview of the field of human evolution and biological anthropology. Specific topics to be discussed include the genetic basis of human evolution, the forces of microevolution, macroevolution, modern human variation, human adaptation, primate behavior and evolution, the human fossil record, and the bioanthropological definitions and issues surrounding race.



Honors Great Debates: Introduction to Historical Communication

*First Time Course Offered through the Honors Program*

24221 HON H150-01H | MWF | 11:00 AM –11:50 AM | LA 210 | 3.0 cr.

This course fulfills the Speaking and Listening Foundational Intellectual Skills (A.2) General Education Requirement. (Note: Gen Ed status for this course does not yet show up in Oasis)

Instructor: Dr. Jeffrey Malanson (History)

This course will use great debates from throughout world history as a starting point for teaching students about best communication practices. Students will learn about effective oral communication, including the delivery of informational and argumentative speeches. We will also consider the best means of receiving and interpreting oral messages.


Honors Religion and Culture

*Updated Course Offering*

22894 REL 11200-02H | W | 4:30 PM – 7:15 PM | LA 134 | 3.0 cr.

This course fulfills the Interdisciplinary Ways of Knowing (B.7) General Education Requirement (or Area IV under the Old General Education Program).

Instructor: Dr. Erik Ohlander (Philosophy)

Ever wonder how scholars account for the phenomenon of religion?

Designed to provide an engaging introduction to the subject, this course furnishes an overview of modern academic theories regarding the origin, form, and function of religion in human life supported by case studies drawn from various world religious traditions. Through a stimulating combination of academic studies and documentaries we will not only survey some of the major classic theorists in the academic study of religion but will endeavor to test the scope and efficacy of their theories by applying them to a series of case studies drawn from various world religious traditions. Our theorists will include the likes of Tylor, Frazer, Marx, Freud, Durkheim, Weber, Evans-Pritchard, Eliade, and Geertz while our case studies will range from Rastafarianism in Jamaica to Zen Buddhism in Japan, Hasidic Judaism in New York City to Islam in Mecca, and Voodoo in rural Haiti to Hinduism along India’s famed Ganges River.


Honors Puzzles, Games, and Problems

22712 HON H302-01H | MWF | 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM | KT 123 | 3.0 cr

This course fulfills the Interdisciplinary Ways of Knowing (B.7) General Education Requirement (or Area VI under the Old General Education Program).

Instructor: Dr. David Maloney (Physics)

Want to improve your thinking and problem solving skills? Consider enrolling in Puzzles, Strategy Games and Scientific Problem Solving, a course in reasoning and metacognition (thinking about your own thinking) that will introduce you to important reasoning and problem solving tools and give you practice using those tools in three different domains. Exploring analytical reasoning and problem solving in three different domains will enable us to compare and contrast how using reasoning skills is affected by the characteristics of a domain. Puzzles, Strategy Games and Scientific Problem Solving is a challenging course that requires the willingness to reason vigorously and communicate clearly, specifically and precisely while playing games along the way.



Honors Analytic Geometry & Calculus II

*Updated Course Offering*

23420 MA 16600-03H | MW | 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM | KT 218 | 4.0 cr
                                   TR  | 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM | KT 218


Prerequisite: Math 165 (Analytic Geometry & Calculus I) with a grade of C or higher.

Instructor: Dr. Dan Coroian (Mathematics)

This is a rigorous look at Calculus with plenty of applications from physics, engineering, natural and social sciences, finance, etc. You will work in groups and individually on different writing and exploratory exercises. In addition to the regular lecture format we’ll use different application of the Computer Algebra System Maple in solving problems. Two projects, reflecting your background, will be assigned and the results of will be presented using your favourite media format. Creativity and originality is strongly encouraged.


Honors Independent Study (Honors Project)

13431 HON-H399-01H | TBA | 3.0 cr.

Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
If you are interested in signing up for this class, you should contact the Honors Program Director.
Instructor: Staff


The Honors Program capstone course is the Honors Project which provides an opportunity for honors students to undertake research under the guidance of a faculty mentor selected by the student. The format varies, but each project encourages intellectual independence and introduces students to proper research methods in preparation for graduate work. Projects must have some written component and will be a product which is representative of professional work in the chosen field. This project must be presented and defended before a committee including representatives of the Honors Program Council.