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The World's Religions Come to the City of Churches: Religious and Cultural Diversity in Fort Wayne and Allen County

The World's Religions Come to the City of Churches: Religious and Cultural Diversity in Fort Wayne and Allen County

An image of Earth with religious symbols circling it.Tuesday, October 2, 2012

With L. Michael Spath, professor of religious studies, philosophy, and Peace and Conflict studies program, IPFW

Our world is shrinking, and the world’s religions are in our backyard, and our neighbors are from different cultures and ethnicities, they come from various parts of the world and religious traditions. Who are our neighbors? What do they believe? How are their traditions adapting to American values and democratic principles? And how are they shaping and re-forming what it means to be “American”?                          

We discussed the increasing religious diversity—theist, non-theist, humanist, atheist—in Allen County, with an interfaith panel consisting of religious leaders from the Fort Wayne area.

About the Presenter

L. Michael Spath has a Doctor of Ministry degree in New Testament. His Ph.D. work is in the intersection of Islam and Christianity, and he has also studied with Rosan Yoshida, master at the St. Louis Zen Center, and with Swami Chetanananda, spiritual director of the St. Louis Vedanta Society. Spath is a member of Plymouth Congregational Church UCC in Fort Wayne. He is also executive director of the Indiana Center for Middle East Peace and the chair the Fort Wayne Urban League’s board.