College of Arts and Sciences

Faculty Course Descriptions

Psychology 100 Level Courses

Psychology 200 Level Courses

Psychology 300 Level Courses

Psychology 400 Level Courses

Psychology 500 Level Courses

 

Please note: These ARE NOT official course descriptions. Official course descriptions can be found in the bulletin.

The Department of Psychology faculty members have provided brief information about the requirements of their courses below. Please keep in mind, this information is only intended to give you a sense of what to expect in the course; instructors reserve the right to make changes to their courses (e.g., assignments, tests) which may not be reflected in this information.

Psychology 100 Level Courses

PSY 100: Introduction to the Science and Fields of Psychology (P= PSY 120)

 

  • Dr. Michael Bendele
    This course provides an orientation to the undergraduate major in psychology. Course topics include career options, exploration and preparation; the graduate school and job application process; academic planning and strategies for success; networking with faculty; involvement in student/campus organizations. Students will complete weekly quizzes, three projects, and campus events. Attendance and class participation are required and monitored.
  • Dr. Elaine Blakemore
    This course provides an orientation to the undergraduate major in psychology. Course topics include career options, exploration and preparation; the graduate school and job application process; academic planning and strategies for success; networking with faculty; involvement in student/campus organizations. Students will complete weekly quizzes, discussions, three projects, and campus events. Attendance and class participation are required and monitored.
  • Dr. Jay Jackson
    This course provides an orientation to the undergraduate major in psychology. Course topics include career options, exploration and preparation; the graduate school and job application process; academic planning and strategies for success; networking with faculty; involvement in student/campus organizations. Students will complete weekly quizzes, discussions, three projects, and campus events. Attendance and class participation are required and monitored.
  • Dr. Lesa Rae Vartanian
    This course provides an orientation to the undergraduate major in psychology. Course topics include career options, exploration and preparation; the graduate school application process; academic planning and strategies for success; networking with faculty; involvement in student/campus organizations. Students will complete a variety of self-assessments, written homework assignments, quizzes, and a semester project. Attendance and class participation are required and monitored. 

 

Psychology 200 Level Courses

PSY 201: Introduction to Quantitative Topics in Psychology (P = PSY 120 and one of the following MA 153, MA 168, or STAT 125)

  • Dr. Bruce Abbott
    This is a basic course in statistical analysis with an emphasis on those statistical tools commonly used in psychological research, including both descriptive statistics (aimed at describing a set of data) and inferential statistics (aimed at drawing conclusions about the characteristics of populations based on samples of data from those populations). The emphasis is not so much on being able to calculate statistical values as on knowing which statistics to choose for a particular analysis and how to properly interpret the results. Quizzes over the material covered include a variety of question formats ranging from fill-in and multiple choice through short-answer essay and the working of problems. Assessment may also be conducted through in-class active learning exercises and take-home assignments.
  • Dr. Michael Bendele
    This course is designed to help you develop statistical skills which will enable you to become both a user and a consumer of basic statistical techniques that are commonly used in contemporary research in the behavioral sciences. Some of the topics in this course include descriptive and inferential statistics, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, sampling, probability, t-test, analysis of variance, and correlation. The majority of the grade is based on 5 exams and 5 quizzes.
  • Dr. Tom Blakemore
    This course is designed to help you acquire the skills needed to become both a user and a consumer of the basic statistical procedures that are commonly used in the behavioral sciences. You will learn some basic terminology, the rationale behind the use of statistics, as well as, how to calculate and interpret a variety of statistical procedures. Grades will be based upon 5 exams plus homework assignments.
  • Dr. Daniel Miller
    This course is designed to provide you with a basic introduction to statistical methods used in psychology and other social sciences. We will cover descriptive statistics (e.g., measures of central tendency and variability) during the first part of the course and inferential statistics during the last third of the course. The middle third of the course includes topics essential for understanding the logic of inferential statistics such as sampling distributions and the basics of hypothesis testing. By the end of the course you should be able to calculate various descriptive and inferential statistics and know when to use them. This knowledge should help you to be a critical reader of statistical information presented in the news media. It will also help you in reading research articles in psychology. The majority of the grade is based on 4 exams and various homework assignments.

 PSY 203: Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology (P = PSY 201, R = ENG W233)

  • Dr. Michael Bendele
    The goal of this course is to help the student gain an understanding of the various methods used by psychologists in studying behavior. The emphasis of the course is on understanding the general principles of research design, implementing various designs, and analyzing and reporting the results. Four in-class exam will be given. The lab component constitutes about 1/3 of the grade and consists of designing and implementing three projects: a content analysis, a survey, and an experiment. These projects are conducted in small groups. Each project is written up in APA style. Course prerequisite is psychology 201.
  • Dr. Daren Kaiser
    Research Methods provides an overview of how the scientific method is implemented in psychological research. The class is divided into a lecture and a laboratory component. Early in the semester lectures will focus on the scientific process in general, but as the class progresses we will narrow our discussion to specific methodologies used by scientists in the field of psychology. In the laboratory portion of the class students will learn to understand and evaluate research materials. Additionally, students will learn how to conduct, analyze, and present research material in empirical reports that conform to the standards of the American Psychological Association. Grades are based on three exams, a cumulative final, and three papers.
    PSY 203 Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology. 
     
  • Dr. Carol Lawton 
    This course examines the variety of research methods used in psychology, including correlational and experimental approaches. The course includes lectures on principles of research design and labs in which research is conducted. Students will learn how to develop research questions, design studies, analyze data, and communicate findings of research using APA style. Students will carry out several projects, typically including a content analysis, survey, and experiment. Grades are based on four papers, four exams, and lab participation.
 

PSY 225 Stereotyping and Prejudice

  • Dr. Daniel Miller
    This is a course on stereotyping and prejudice from a psychological perspective. The course will familiarize students with both basic and advanced concepts in areas such as social cognition, social stigma, affective and motivational processes, theories of prejudice, and prejudice reduction. Emphasis is placed upon objective observation and scientific investigation. Course objectives are: To help students learn basic theoretical foundations, research methods, and empirical findings in the areas of stereotypes and prejudice. To increase insight into students' own behaviors/cognitions and that of others. To develop a critical analysis of generalizations from research. To foster critical thinking skills by requiring students to elaborate upon concepts introduced in class.

 

PSY 235: Child Psychology P = PSY 120

  • Dr. Elaine Blakemore
    The course examines relevant research and theory dealing with a broad range of developmental issues such as: prenatal development, cognitive development, social development, family and peer relationships, gender and moral development, and the impact of influences outside the family. Course requirements usually involve four or five multiple choice tests. Assigned readings are used for class discussion sessions.
  • Dr. Ken Bordens
    The course examines relevant research and theory dealing with a broad range of developmental issues such as: prenatal development, cognitive development, sex roles, the development of perception, memory, etc. Course requirements usually involve four or five multiple choice tests. A book of readings is usually used as a supplement to the text. Articles are discussed during discussion sessions and an article analysis may be handed in.
     
  •  Dr. Michelle Drouin
    This course is designed to give students greater insight into the theories and processes of child development. After covering the major developmental theories, we begin to dissect this subject by topic. We cover issues related to children's normative development, such social attachment, but also discuss issues that relate to disturbances in that development, such as the effects of attention deprivation. There are typically four exams in this course, a debate, and online and class participation opportunities.
     
  • Dr. Brenda Lundy
    PSY 235 covers general principles of children’s behavior and development from conception to adolescence, including sensory and motor development, and the basic psychological processes such as learning, motivation, and socialization. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a in-depth, empirically-based look at the factors underlying development from conception through adolescence. There are 4-5 multiple choice exams and three short reaction papers required.
     
  •  Dr. Lesa Rae Vartanian
    The purpose of this course is to introduce the major phenomena, themes, and issues concerning typical physical growth and psychological development from conception through late childhood (roughly 10-11 years of age). General topics to be covered include historical/philosophical perspectives on children and their development, the science of child development, the biological/genetic bases of development, prenatal development, cognitive and language development, moral development, social and emotional development. Classic and current theories, research, and issues will be addressed. Attendance is monitored; students take 4-5 objective-style unit exams and complete 3-4 other assignments (e.g., engage in on-line disucssions about controversial issues related to children and their development, complete observations of infants and children, etc.)

 

PSY 240: Social Psychology (R = PSY 120)

  • Dr. Ken Bordens
    The course focuses upon interpersonal dynamics. Topics covered include: Social cognition and attribution, interpersonal attraction, attitudes, prejudice, persuasion and propaganda, social influence (obedience and conformity), group dynamics, aggression, and altruism. Typically there are five multiple choice exams given each semester. A book of readings is used as a supplement to the text. Articles are discussed during in-class discussion sessions and an article analysis may be submitted. Attendance is required.
     
  • Dr. Craig Hill
    The course provides an understanding of theory and research in major areas of social psychology, including the self, social perception, prejudice and discrimination, attitudes, persuasion, attitude change, social influence, group processes, close relationships, aggression, and altruism. Grades are based on five exams, four written article analyses, participation in class discussions on the articles, and completion of two internet activities.
     
  •  Dr. Jay Jackson
    This course is a general survey of the field of social psychology, which may be defined as the scientific study of how individuals think about, influence, and interact with each other. Topics covered include those related to (a) social thinking, such as how we form perceptions of ourselves and others, and the nature of prejudice and stereotyping; (b) social influence, such as attitude formation, persuasion, conformity and obedience; and (c) social relations, such as group processes, close relationships, interpersonal aggression, and helping behavior. The emphasis will be on formal theories and experimental research findings, but we will also address how social psychological principles are applied to concrete real world issues. Course grades are based on five exams, participation in class activities, and three written assignments.
 

PSY 251: Health Psychology P = PSY 120

  • Dr. David Young
    Health Psychology encompasses a vast array of problems and prospects for people looking for a long and satisfying life. The key feature that this class emphasizes is that health problems are best understood from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Bio-medical models of illness provide one important way of understanding health and illness, but other approaches which acknowledge the role of psychosocial factors allow for a more complete picture of the meaning of health, and illness. One such model, called the biopsychosocial model, provides the foundation for this course. What this model emphasizes is that most health problems have aspects or components, which are social, psychological, and biological. An appreciation of the contributions of these multiple components can assist us not only in understanding problems of health and illness, but also in the treatment and prevention of those problems. The course begins with a general introduction to these topics, and the proceeds to review the contributions of this biopsychosocial model to understanding a number of health problems. In addition to the readings for this class, each student will have two additional assignments. The first assignment will be to observe some aspect of addiction, research the literature in that area, and write a short paper summarizing your work and conclusions. In the second assignment, each student is to complete a personal behavior change project. You will track a behavior for a week and develop and implement a change program. Four multiple choice exams will make up the remainder of your grade. The final is non-cumulative.

 

PSY 272: Psychological Foundations of Work Behavior: Intro to Industrial/Organizational Psychology

  • Dr. Dan Miller
    Survey of psychological principles and research methods relevant to organizations and industry. Topics covered include motivation, communication, leadership, conflict, and organizational effectiveness. Also covered are personnel selection, the work situation, human errors, and accidents.

 

 Psychology 300 Level Courses

PSY 314 Introduction to Learning (P = PSY 120, R = ENG 233)

  • Dr. Bruce Abbott
    How we behave at any given time depends not only on the current environment but also on how previous experience has changed us. Much of our current knowledge about the effects of learning on behavior have come from laboratory studies of animals, and this area of research continues to be active today. This course provides an overview of what has been learned from these studies. After briefly reviewing the historical development of key ideas, we first examine behavior from an ethological perspective and identify some innate mechanisms that probably underlie all behavior. Next, we investigate habituation and sensitization (two simple forms of learning) and learn about the physiological mechanisms that may be involved in these processes. We then turn our attention to classical (Pavlovian) conditioning, explore a number of phenomena involving it, and learn about current attempts to understand these phenomena from a theoretical perspective. Operant conditioning and its associated phenomena then receive a similar treatment. Finally, we take a more cognitive (as opposed to behaviorist) orientation and explore a variety of topics, including the question whether animals other than ourselves can learn to use language. Assessment typically includes several unit quizzes spaced over the semester and at least one term paper.
     
  •  Dr. Carol Lawton
    This course focuses on the basis principles of learning across species, including habituation, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, social learning, and animal memory and cognition. We examine experimental evidence derived from studies on animals and humans, and make applications to practical situations, such as child-raising and pet training. The term project uses behavior modification techniques to try to change a behavior of your own (e.g, exercise more, snack less, quit smoking). In addition, there are four exams and a journal assignment using personal experiences to illustrate concepts covered in class.

 

PSY 317: Addictions: Biology Psychology and Society (P = Placement at or above ENG W131)

  • Dr. Jeannie DiClementi
    This multidisciplinary course is aimed at the non-science major, but is appropriate for Psychology students as well. Team taught by faculty from the biology and psychology departments, the basics of science including genetics, pharamcology, immunology, and psychology will be taught using the process of addiction as the model. Four classes of substances of abuse will be used: nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and psychostimulants. In additition to lecture and reading material, the course will also include classroom laboratory exercises and a service learning component. Cross-listed with Biology.

 

PSY 329: Psychobiology (P = PSY 120 & R = ENG W233)

  • Dr. Daren Kaiser
    Psychobiology provides an overview of the relationships between biological processes (particularly in the brain) and behavior. We begin with an introduction to the structure and functions of the nervous system and the methods used in psychobiological research. Following this, we discuss selected topics in psychobiology, including the effects of drugs on the brain and behavior, psychobiology of sleeping and eating, psychobiological correlates of selected psychological disorders, and psychobiology of learning and memory. Typical requirements include 4 exams and 1 literature review (8-10 pages).

 

PSY 334: Cross Cultural Psychology (R = PSY 120)

  • Dr. Jeannie DiClementi
    Examination and restructuring of the major psychological principles from a cultural perspective. A study of the diversity of development of the individual across Asian, African-American, Latino/a, and American Indian/Alaskan Native cultures will be presented. The experience of self, role of the family and community, and the psychology of prejudice will be emphasized. Issues related to the workplace, religion, sexual orientation, ability status, and gender will also be discussed. It will be assumed that the student already has a familiarity with major psychological theories and terminology. There will be exams, written assignments, and experiential exercises both in class and outside of class.

 

PSY 345: Psychology of Women (P = PSY 120)

  • Dr. Elaine Blakemore
    This course covers psychological research and theorizing as particularly relevant to the behavior and experience of women. Topics include gender roles, gender differences in behavior, socialization, biological influences on behavior, health issues (e.g., pregnancy, anorexia), sexuality, sexual orientation, marriage, relationships, mental health, therapy, and violence against women. Typically there are four exams, a paper or project (including the possiblity of service learning), and discussions of assigned readings.
     
  •  Dr. Carol Lawton
    This course examines research and theories relevant to the psychology of women. Topics include gender roles and gender differences; development in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood; biological influences on behavior; sexuality; sexual orientation; violence against women; women and work; and physical and mental health. Each student will carry out a project that may involve data collection, a literature review, or service learning at a community agency. There are also four exams, discussion assignments based on supplementary readings, and in-class film assignments.

 

PSY 350: Abnormal Psychology (R = PSY 120)

  • Dr. Jeannie DiClementi
    An overview of major functional and organic disorders, theories of mental disorders, and assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of mental disorders, and cultural views of abnormal behavior. There are typically four multiple choice exams, several journal article reviews, and a major paper.
     
  •  Dr. David Young
    This three-credit course is designed to explore the origins, diagnosis, and treatment of a wide range of psychopathology. Using a standard text as a guide, supplemented with actual audio and video recordings of patient interviews, students are taught about the various disorders from the psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, and biological viewpoints. Grades are based on four examinations. Exams are multiple choice and short answer essay.

 

PSY 353: Social and Personality Development in Children (P = PSY 235 or PSY 369)

  • Dr. Elaine Blakemore
    This course covers children's social and personality development. It includes topics such as the influence of heredity and environment on personality and social behavior; children's social relationships in the family (e.g., parenting styles, child abuse, divorce and remarriage, gay and lesbian families); social behaviors such as aggression, achievement, and gender development; and influences outside the family such as peers, television, and school. There are typically quizzes, a midterm and final, a project (including the possibility of service learning), and discussions of articles.
     
  • Dr. Michelle Drouin
    This is an upper-level undergraduate, General Education Area VI: Advanced Study course that considers theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues relevant to the study of human social and personality development, with a focus on childhood. Through the analysis of scientific research, we will explore normative social and personality development in children and its relation to adult behavior. There will be three exams in this course as well as research article reading assignments. Students complete either an APA style research paper on a topic relevant to the course or complete a service learning project. Students are also expected to provide a brief presentation to the class.

 

PSY 362: Human Development II: Adolescence (P = PSY 235 or PSY 369, sophomore class standing, R = ENG W233)

  • Dr. Lesa Rae Vartanian
    This is an upper-level undergraduate, General Education Area VI: Advanced Study course that considers theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues relevant to the study of human social and personality development, with a focus on childhood. Through the analysis of scientific research, we will explore normative social and personality development in children and its relation to adult behavior. There will be three exams in this course as well as research article reading assignments. Students complete either an APA style research paper on a topic relevant to the course or complete a service learning project. Students are also expected to provide a brief presentation to the class.

 

PSY 365: Development of Gender Roles in Children (P = PSY 235 or PSY 369)

  • Dr. Elaine Blakemore
    The purpose of this course is to study the factors that influence the development of gender roles in children. Factors studied include biological (e.g., hormones), the influence of parents, teachers, peers, and others, as well as the child's own understanding of gender. We will also discuss the implications of growing up as a boy or a girl for adult life. There are typically four exams, discussions, and a paper. 
     
     

PSY 367: Adult Development and Aging (P = PSY 235 or PSY 369, sophomore class standing, R = ENG W233)

  • Dr. Lesa Rae Vartanian
    This is an upper-level undergraduate, General Education Area VI: Analysis and Inquiry course concerned with physical, cognitive, and social development during adulthood, with special emphasis on older adulthood. Topics to be covered include: the definition of adulthood and the demographics of aging; theories and principles of lifespan developmental psychology; physical and biological aging; changes in cognitive functioning; identity development and social development, close relationships, and social role transitions; death and bereavement. This course will provide students with an empirically-based look at psychological development during adulthood, and will seek to dispel popular myths about normal aging. A variety of written homework assignments are given, and class participation (individual and in small groups) comprises a portion of students' grades. The two exams (midterm and final) are essay-style. Students complete either a 10-12 page focused literature review in a relevant topic area OR conduct an interview project. Opportunities for service learning and off campus field trips may become available soon.

PSY 369: Development Across the LifeSpan (P = PSY 120)

  • Dr. Michelle Drouin
    In this course, we cover the major developmental issues and topics from the prenatal period until death in a chronological order. The major concepts of child development are still discussed in depth, but our analysis of developmental issues extends beyond adolescence in this course. Therefore, we cover topics ranging from the ability for infants to learn in utero, to the crises of young adulthood, to the stages of the grieving process. There are typically four exams in this course and online and class participation opportunities.PSY 369 and PSY 235 cannot both be taken for credit toward graduation.
  • Dr. Brenda Lundy
    PSY 369 considers theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues relevant to the study of human development from conception through late adulthood. Biological, cognitive personality, and social aspects of development will be covered. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an in-depth, empirically-based look at the factors underlying developmental transitions. Student complete either an APA style research paper on a topic relevant to the course or complete service learning project. Students are also expected to provide a brief presentation to the class. There are 4-5 exams with multiple choice and short answer/essay questions. PSY 369 and PSY 235 cannot both be taken for credit toward graduation.

PSY 371: Death & Dying (P = PSY 120 & junior class standing, R = ENG W233)

  • Dr. Lesa Rae Vartanian
    This is a multidisciplinary, empirically-based consideration of emotions, behaviors, and cognitions related to death and the process of dying. Topics include: cultural and historical differences in concepts of death, dying, grief, and bereavement; individual differences related to preparation, adjustment, and coping, as well as discussion of special topics (e.g., hospice and palliative care, physician-assisted suicide, media coverage of death and dying, etc.). PSY 371 is an Area 6 Analysis and Inquiry General Education Course. This course emphasizes active and experiential learning; there will be a number of off campus field trips, presentations by guest speakers, written homework assignments, and small group discussions. The two exams (midterm and final) are essay-style. Students complete either a 15-20 page research paper on a relevant topic OR complete a service learning project within a local agency (e.g., Erin’s House for Grieving Children; Visiting Nurse Service & Hospice).

 

PSY 392: Special Topics

  • Cognition and Artificial Intelligence
    Dr. Michael Bendele
    (P= 6 credits in Psychology and consent of the instructor)
    This course serves as an introduction to the area of Cognitive Science which is an interdisciplinary approach to looking at issues related to the mind. Some of these issues include consciousness, mental representations, problem solving, perception, associative learning, language, abstract thinking, retrieval of information, and mental imagery. This course will approach these topics from several different perspectives that constitute Cognitive Science which include cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, philosophy, neuroscience, and linguistics. Special emphasis will be placed on the cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence perspective. Grades are based on four in class exams, a research paper, a presentation, and class participation.
     
  • Memory
    Dr. Michael Bendele
    (P = 6 credits in Psychology and consent of the instructor)
    This course serves as an overview of many of the topics and issues relevant to the area of memory research. Some of the potential topics for the course include: models of memory, types of memory, types of forgetting, types of memory distortions, autobiographical memory, eyewitness identification, and false memory. Grades are based on four in class exams, journal assignments, a presentation, and class participation.
     
  • Applied Behavior Analysis
    Dr. Tom Blakemore
    (P= 6 credits in Psychology)
    This course introduces students to the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (sometimes referred to as Behavior Modification). Topics include: techniques used to analyze behavior to determine its function or purpose, methods used to increase or decrease behavior, data collection methods, research methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of behavior change programs, and ethical issues related to behavior modification. Students have the opportunity to design and implement a program to change their own behavior. Grades are based on 4 exams, two presentations or short papers reviewing research articles, plus one APA style paper describing a self-change project.
     
  • Undergraduate Teaching Assistance
    Dr. Craig Hill & Dr. Michael Bendele
    (P = 6 credits in Psychology, 6 additional credits in Psychology, and consent of instructor)
    This course provides students with the opportunity to address issues related to teaching in psychology by supervising them in their role as a Teaching Assistant.  This course is divided into an Academic Component in which students register for and participate in the course, PSY 392 Undergraduate Teaching Experience, and a Hands-On Component in which the student is assigned to a PSY 120 professor to assist in various aspects of managing a section of PSY 120.  Teaching assistants do not register as a student for PSY 120; they only register for PSY 392.  The course addresses issues concerning practical aspects of teaching and serving as a TA.  Students also discuss academic articles published about such topics as helping students develop critical thinking skills, strategies to motivate students to learn, ethics involved in teaching, writing exams, and providing feedback to students.  The only way of registering for PSY 392 is to be admitted by Dr. Bendele and Dr. Hill.  A set of criteria are employed to select students: (a) a minimum GPA of 3.20, preferably higher in courses in psychology, (b) prefer Junior or Senior standing, (c) meeting with Dr. Bendele or Dr. Hill to determine the match of the responsibilities and demands of the TA course with the capabilities, goals, and interests of each TA candidate, and (d) preference is given to students recommended by Psychology department faculty.
     
  • Undergraduate Teaching Experience in Psychology
    Dr. Lesa Rae Vartanian
    (P = PSY 235 & consent of instructor)
    This course is intended to give you a unique educational experience as an undergraduate teaching assistant (UTA) for PSY 235: Child Psychology. Under the supervision of the course instructor, you will provide support and assistance to students enrolled in PSY 235 and to the course instructor. Some of the typical duties include: leading exam review sessions; proctoring exams; monitoring students’ participation in on-line discussions; grading of small writing assignments. UTAs are expected to attend the PSY 235 course on a regular basis, and to keep a weekly journal of their activities and experiences in the role of UTA. Although some weeks will entail more work than others, one should plan on 6-9 hours of work per week on average.

PSY 392/592: The Psychology of HIV Disease

  • Dr. Jeannie DiClementi
    HIV/AIDS is one of the major health issues we face today. Allen County has the second highest infection rate in the state of Indiana, and knowlecdge of and understanding HIV disease with the associated health and mental health issues is very important for current and future professionals. Topics covered in this course will include epidemiology, clinical course, prevention, transmission, neuropsychology of HIV/AIDS, special populations, treatment adherence, chronic and acute mental illness. Classroom material in lecture format will be supplemented with online material made available via WebCT Vista. Grades will be based on exams, participation in class and online discussions, and brief exercises. Requirements for students taking this for graduate credit will be more stringent and in depth.

  Psychology 400 Level Courses

PSY 416: Cognitive Psychology (P = PSY 120 & junior class standing, R = ENG W233)

  • Dr. Michael Bendele
    This course provides a survey of the science of Cognitive Psychology. It includes the study of knowledge representation, models of memory, memory processes, language, problem solving, cognitive development, intelligence, and artificial intelligence. Four in class exams (80%) with the format consisting typically of multiple choice, short answer, and essay items are given. Students will also write an APA style review article that critically evaluates previously published material (10%) in addition to a group presentation based on the topic of the review article (4%). Warm-up exercises (3%) which provide an opportunity to explore issues in cognitive psychology, and class participation (3%).
     
  •  Dr. Brenda Lundy
    This is an upper-level undergraduate course. This course covers a variety of research and theories within the field of cognitive psychology. A number of different topics areas will be reviewed including attention, perception, memory, knowledge representation, language, problem solving and decision making. This course requires that students complete a series of web-based demonstration experiments in cognitive psychology, participate in group presentations of empirical articles in cognitive psychology, and write an APA style research paper. There are 4-5 exams with multiple choice and short answer/essay questions.

 

PSY 419: Psychopharmacology (P= PSY 329 or consent of instructor)

  • Dr. Daren Kaiser
    Examines the clinical substrates of behavior and the influences of various drugs (experimental, clinical, and recreational) on the nervous system and behavior. Pharmacological principles, behavioral procedures, neurophysiology, and synaptic transmission are reviewed. Major neurotransmitter systems in the brain are discussed in terms of the behaviors in which they are involved and the drugs that affect them. Emphasis is placed on using drug effects to understand the brain's control of behavior.

 
PSY 420: Introduction to Personality Theory (P = 6 credits in Psychology, R = ENG W233)

  • Dr. Craig Hill
    The most prominent theories of personality are presented from the four major theoretical perspectives: the psychoanalytic approach, the behavioral approach, the trait approach, and the phenomenological approach. Each theory will be examined as conceived by its advocates, along with modifications made by later proponents, the theory’s applications, and research that has been generated by each approach. Finally, each theory will be evaluated in terms of its strengths and weaknesses. The course will consist of not only lectures, but also four class discussions on original readings by the authors of the various theories. Grades will be based on the four discussions, four exams, and two short papers that involve application of the theoretical approaches to an individual’s life.
     
  • Dr. Jay W. Jackson
    This course provides an introduction to personality psychology, which may be defined as the scientific study of whole individuals and individual differences. We will examine the research methodologies used by personality psychologists and survey the six major approaches to personality: the trait approach, the biological approach, the psychodymanic approach, the humanistic approach, the social learning approach, and the cognitive approach.

 

 
PSY 426: Language Development

  • Dr. Michelle Drouin
    Linguistic descriptions, successive stages, and psychological explanations of typical patterns of oral language development.

 
PSY 441: Advanced Research in Personality and Social Psychology (P= PSY 201, PSY 203, and either PSY 240 or PSY 420)

  • Dr. Jay Jackson
    In this course, students will have the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the principles, concepts, theories, and research methods used by personality and social psychologists. This course will demand a high level of student participation and responsibility in two broad ways. First, in place of standard lectures, students will be asked to actively participate in class discussions and demonstrations of central topics. Second, students will gain "hands-on" experience by conducting an empirical study pertaining to personality and social psychology, and by engaging in a variety of laboratory exercises. Course grades will be based on weekly discussions and critiques of research articles, performance on laboratory exercises, and performance on various phases of a major research project, including an oral presentation of the final results.

 
PSY 444: Human Sexual Behavior (P = PSY 120, Junior class standing)

  • Dr. Craig Hill
    The course is intended to provide an in-depth, advanced-level understanding of the psychology of sexuality, with a particular focus on personality and social factors involved in sexuality.  That is, sexuality is examined from a psychological perspective, although the subject necessarily involves biological, cultural, medical, ethical, and legal issues. The course covers an extensive range of topics, including religious and historical influences;  societal values; methods in sex research; personality; gender; sexual identity; sexual orientation; attraction, desire, love, intimacy, and relationships; ethnicity and race; the biopsychology of sexuality; and sexual development and behavior across the lifespan.  The purpose of the course is to provide a basic understanding of the academic study of human sexuality, and wherever possible the scientific study of human sexuality.  A strong emphasis is placed on the theoretical bases of scientific research, that is, on the logic underlying research and the methods employed.  Grades will be based on four exams, participation in critical thinking discussions, and a term research paper.


PSY 480: Field Experience in Psychology (P = Consent of instructor)

  • Dr. David Young
    This summer course is designed to give the student the opportunity to experience genuine mental health work that many only read about or hear about in lecture.  Of course, we will do some reading, talking ,and some writing too.  Two textbooks, my book on psychotherapy and The Pocket Handbook of Clinical Psychiatry, will be the focus of the readings. Students will rotate in pairs on the following units of an acute care psychiatric hospital: child, adolescent, adult, chemical dependency, and intensive out-patient (day hospital).  I will be onsite for supervision.  We will meet one day a week at the university to process our experiences.  As the course is experienced based, grading will have to be done a bit differently as I will not administer exams.  I will grade your final logbooks, attendance, participation in class, and any written homework in addition to my observation of your performance at the hospital. I am also asking staff at the hospital to assist with providing feedback while you are there.  Note: This course may be repeated for credit.

 
PSY 480: Field Placement in a Community Setting (P = Major in Psychology, junior or senior standing and consent of instructor)

  • Dr. David Young
    Opportunity for the psychology student to obtain practical experience in the field working with various populations and in various settings. Experiences involve application of specific, relevant concepts and skills in supervised volunteer placements. Field Placement will require the student to keep a daily log and volunteer and average of 6-9 hours per week. Students should meet weekly with supervisors. There will also be written evaluations conducted jointly by the on-site supervisor and the student.  Limited enrollment. 

 
PSY 490: Practicum in Clinical Psychotherapy (P= Junior class standing and consent of instructor)

  • Dr. David Young
    This seminar is designed for students to obtain supervised “hands on” experience in clinical interviewing techniques. Students will also observe live psychotherapy cases in the departmental clinic. There is one required text and a variety of reading handouts. Students are required to: (1) prepare a weekly written summary of a therapy case they have observed, (2) discuss a weekly reading assignment, (3) write and present a paper on some major aspect of psychotherapy, (4) prepare a detailed written analysis of a family observation. Class size is usually limited to 10 students. As this course is usually offered only once each academic year, it would be wise for interested students to contact Dr. Young as soon as possible. Prerequisite is permission of instructor.

  Psychology 500 Level Courses

PSY 540: History of Psychology (P = Senior class standing and 12 credits in Psychology)

  • Dr. Ken Bordens
    History of Psychology surveys the early history of Psychology. The philosophical and physiological roots of Psychology are explored before looking at how contemporary psychology evolved in the 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on the schools of Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, and the Gestalt School. Requirements for the course include: Four multiple choice exams, a paper (about the role of an important person in the history of Psychology or the history of an area in Psychology), a presentation to the class based on the paper, participation in discussion sessions during which original works from the history of psychology are discussed, an article commentary on one of the articles on the discussion/reading list and attendance.
     
  • Dr. Jay W. Jackson
    This course surveys the major philosophical, theoretical, and methodological developments that have shaped psychology as a scientific discipline and applied profession. While the course will focus on the history of modern psychology, we will also delve into the earlier philosophical and psysiological roots of the discipline. The effects of social forces as well as the contributions of particular individuals will be emphasized.

 
PSY 550: Introduction to Clinical Psychology (P= 12 credits in psychology)

  • Dr.Jeannie DiClementi
    This course will be taught along two tracks: First, as a survey course, covering the field of Clinical Psychology from its historical underpinnings to the scientific foundations, and theoretical orientation of the field, highlighting the activities, roles, and responsibilities of today's clinical psychologist, with an emphasis on ethics.  The second track will be the clinical interview, a skill that has application in a variety of settings. Students will understand the theory and application of the interview and its various elements, including issues of competency and mental status, and will apply these in classroom demonstrations.  The course will have two textbooks, a significant amount of reading, written exams, regular ethics problem-solving exercises. Students will be expected to produce a video of a clinical interview as a final project.