Celebrate 50 Years
Community Research Institute

Frequently Asked Questions

Table of Contents:

 

Economic Growth Regions

  1. What is an Economic Growth Region or EGR?
  2. How many Economic Growth Regions or EGRs does Indiana have?
  3. Which Economic Growth Region or EGR does Allen County belong to?

Statistical Areas

  1. What is a Metropolitan Statistical Area or MSA?
  2. What is a Micropolitan Statistical Area or MicroSA?
  3. What is a Combined Statistical Area or CSA?
  4. Do statistical areas change?
  5. What is the history of statistical areas?
  6. Which counties are part of the Fort Wayne Metropolitan Statistical Area?
  7. How many statistical areas are in Northeast Indiana?

Consumer Price Index

  1. What is the Consumer Price Index or CPI?
  2. How is the Consumer Price Index or CPI calculated?

Seasonal Adjustment

  1. What is seasonal adjustment?

Do you have a question that was not listed above? Contact us and we will do our best to respond to your question.

 

Question: What is an Economic Growth Region or EGR?

Answer: The Economic Growth Region or EGR is a term used to define economic regions in Indiana, based on economic or social ties. The Economic Growth Region concept came about as part of the Indiana Department of Workforce Development's 2005 Strategic Skills Initiative (SSI), designed to align the state's economic and workforce development efforts and address anticipated workforce shortages. The Indiana Business Research Center (IBRC) of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University was asked to review commuting patterns, demographics, and other quantifiable factors in order to group counties by region. The Indiana Department of Workforce Development has built upon these definitions and is using 11 regions for which workforce statistics are created and maintained as part of the Federal Workforce Investment Act.

Back to top

 

Question: How many Economic Growth Regions or EGRs does Indiana have?

Answer: Indiana has 11 economic growth regions or EGRs. See STATS Indiana's Indiana Regions Spreadsheet that lists each county with the regions and statistical areas in which they are located, plus county seats.

Back to top

 

Question: Which Economic Growth Region or EGR does Allen County belong to?

Answer: Allen County belongs to Economic Growth Region or EGR 3.

Back to top

 

Question: What is a Metropolitan Statistical Area or MSA?

Answer: A Metropolitan Statistical Area or MSA is a term used to define an economic area so that data can be compared. Under the 1990 standards, an area qualifies for recognition as an MSA in one of two ways: (1) if it includes a city of at least 50,000 population, or (2) if it includes a Bureau of the Census-defined urbanized area (of at least 50,000 population) and has a total metropolitan population of at least 100,000 (75,000 in New England). (The population of Fort Wayne as of the 2000 census was 205,727). In addition to the county(ies) containing the main city or urbanized area, an MSA may include additional counties that have strong economic and social ties to the central county(ies) and meet other specified requirements of metropolitan character. The ties are determined chiefly by census data on commuting to work. A MSA may contain more than one city of 50,000 population and may cross state lines.

Back to top

 

Question: What is a Micropolitan Statistical Area or MicroSA?

Answer: A Micropolitan Statistical Area or MicroSA is a defined economic area has at least ONE urban cluster of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000 population and also include adjacent counties that have a minimum of 25% commuting to the central county.

Back to top

 

Question: What is a Combined Statistical Area or CSA?

Answer: A Combined Statistical Area or CSA is a defined economic area that may comprise two or more MSAs, a MSA and a MicroSA, 2 or more MicroSAs, or multiple MSAs and MicroSAs.

Back to top

 

Question: Do statistical areas change?

Answer: Statistical areas do change. Every 10 years or so, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget reviews standards and definitions which may result in new MSAs or totally new definitions, such as Micropolitan Statistical Areas and Combined Statistical Areas. However, the MSA definition has not changed. It is still an area having at least one urbanized area of 50,000 or more population, with at least 25% commuting to the central county.

Back to top

 

Question: What is the history of statistical areas?

Answer: The term "Standard Metropolitan Area" was first used in 1949, although the federal government had experimented with the concept since 1910. Such terms as "Labor Market Area", "Metropolitan Districts", "Metro counties", etc. were used during that period. The criteria were revised and reissued over the years to achieve a more objective definition and the term "Statistical" was added in 1983, that is "Metropolitan Statistical Area" (MSA), the term we are familiar with today. These defined areas aided comparison of socioeconomic factors such as labor force, industrial output, and criminal records.

Back to top

 

Question: Which counties are part of the Fort Wayne Metropolitan Statistical Area?

Answer: The Fort Wayne Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) consists of Allen, Wells, and Whitley Counties. The population of the FW MSA according to the 2010 Census was 416,257. The definition had changed in 2003 with OMB Bulletin No. 03-04 and had previously consisted of 6 counties: Adams, Allen, DeKalb, Huntington, Wells, and Whitley counties.

Back to top

 

Question: How many statistical areas are in Northeast Indiana?

Answer: The new combined Statistical Areas and the component statistical areas for NEI are as follows:


Fort Wayne Metropolitan Area (FW MSA)

  • Allen County
  • Wells County
  • Whitley County

Fort Wayne-Huntington-Auburn Combined Statistical Area (CSA)

  • Adams County
  • Allen County
  • DeKalb County
  • Huntington County
  • Noble County
  • Steuben County
  • Wells County
  • Whitley County

Northeast Indiana also has seven Micropolitan Statistical Areas:

  • Angola Micropolitan Statistical Area
  • Auburn Micropolitan Statistical Area
  • Decatur Micropolitan Statistical Area
  • Huntington Micropolitan Statistical Area
  • Kendallville Micropolitan Statistical Area
  • Marion Micropolitan Statistical Area
  • Wabash Micropolitan Statistical Area

Back to top

 

Question: What is the Consumer Price Index or CPI?

Answer: The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is the ratio of the value of a basket of goods in the current year to the value of that same basket of goods in an earlier year. It measures the average level of prices of the goods and services typically consumed by an urban American family. (Parkin, 1990). Two CPIs are published: 1) The CPI for ALL URBAN Consumers (CPI-U) which covers approximately 87 percent of the population, and 2) the CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) which covers approximately 32 percent of the total population. CRI reports the CPI-U. The CPI is based on prices of food, clothing, shelter, transportation, medical care, and other goods and services that people buy for day-to-day living.

Back to top

 

Question: How is the Consumer Price Index or CPI calculated?

Answer: To calculate CPI, price changes for the various items in 87 locations are averaged together with weights which represent their importance in the spending of the appropriate population group. Indexes for different months are usually compared in relative terms. Thus, an index of 133.5 is 1.063 times higher than an index of 125.6; in other words, prices increased 6.3 percent. For more information, visit the Bureau of Labor Statistics' CPI site.

Back to top

 

Question: What is seasonal adjustment?

Answer: Over the year, the size of the Nation's labor force, the levels of employment and unemployment, and other measures of labor market activity undergo sharp fluctuations due to seasonal events including changes in weather, harvests, major holidays, and the opening and closing of schools. Because these seasonal events follow a more or less regular pattern each year, their influence on statistical trends can be eliminated by adjusting the statistics from month to month. These adjustments make it easier to observe the cyclical, long term trend and other nonseasonal movements in the series. In evaluating changes in a seasonally adjusted series, it is important to note that seasonal adjustment is an approximation and initial adjustment must be based on experience.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Back to top